Chronic marginal iron intakes during early development in mice result in persistent changes in dopamine metabolism and myelin composition

Catherine L. Kwik-Uribe, Dorothy Gietzen, J. Bruce German, Mari S. Golub, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

120 Scopus citations

Abstract

Marginal iron (Fe) deficiency is prevalent in children worldwide, yet the behavioral and biochemical effects of chronic marginal Fe intakes during early development are not well characterized. Using a murine model, previous work in our laboratory demonstrated persistent behavioral disturbances as a consequence of marginal Fe intakes during early development. In the present study, Swiss-Webster mice fed a control Fe diet (75 μg Fe/g diet, n = 13 litters) or marginal Fe diet (14 μg Fe/g diet, n = 16 litters) during gestation and through postnatal day (PND) 75 were killed on PND 75 for assessment of tissue mineral concentrations, dopamine metabolism, myelin fatty acid composition, and c- and m-aconitase activities. In addition, these outcomes were assessed in a group of offspring (n = 13 litters) fed a marginal Fe diet during gestation and lactation and then fed a control diet from PND 21-75. Marginal Fe mice demonstrated significant differences in brain iron concentrations, dopamine metabolism and myelin fatty acid composition relative to control mice; however, no difference in c- or m-aconitase activity was demonstrated in the brain. The postnatal consumption of Fe-adequate diets among marginal Fe offspring did not fully reverse all of the observed biochemical disturbances. This study demonstrates that chronic marginal Fe intakes during early development can result in significant changes in brain biochemistry. The persistence of some of these biochemical changes after postnatal Fe supplementation suggests that they are an irreversible consequence of developmental Fe restriction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2821-2830
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume130
Issue number11
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • c-aconitase
  • Dopamine
  • Iron deficiency
  • m-aconitase
  • Marginal iron
  • Mice
  • Myelin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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    Kwik-Uribe, C. L., Gietzen, D., German, J. B., Golub, M. S., & Keen, C. L. (2000). Chronic marginal iron intakes during early development in mice result in persistent changes in dopamine metabolism and myelin composition. Journal of Nutrition, 130(11), 2821-2830.