Chronic marginal iron intakes during early development in mice alter brain iron concentrations and behavior despite postnatal iron supplementation

Catherine L. Kwik-Uribe, Mari S. Golub, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the behavioral and cognitive outcomes associated with chronic marginal iron (Fe) intakes during early development. Offspring (3 males and 3 females/litter) of Swiss-Webster female mice who had been fed a control Fe diet (75 μg Fe/g diet) or marginal Fe diet (14 μg Fe/g diet) for 9 wk before mating were weaned on postnatal (PND) 21. Offspring of marginal Fe dams were fed either the marginal Fe diet (marginal group) or a control diet (replete group) from PND 21 throughout the duration of the study, whereas offspring of control dams consumed the control diet ad libitum (control group). On PND 30, 45 and 60, one male and female per litter underwent grip strength and auditory startle testing. A Morris maze was used to assess cognitive function in males starting at PND 50. Marginal Fe mice consistently demonstrated significantly lower grip strength, which was independent of differences in body weight. In addition, marginal Fe males demonstrated attenuated startle responsiveness, as well as altered performance in the Morris water maze. These differences in performance were found in association with lower brain Fe concentrations. Postnatal Fe supplementation did not reverse all of these disturbances because differences in brain Fe concentrations and maze learning persisted. This study demonstrates that chronic marginal Fe intakes during early development can result in persistent biochemical and behavioral changes in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2040-2048
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume130
Issue number8
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Behavior
  • Brain iron
  • Development
  • Iron
  • Iron deficiency
  • Mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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