Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles

Karen L. Bales, Allison M. Perkeybile, Olivia G. Conley, Meredith H. Lee, Caleigh D. Guoynes, Griffin M. Downing, Catherine R. Yun, Marjorie Solomon Friedman, Suma Jacob, Sally P. Mendoza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Oxytocin (OT) is a hormone shown to be involved in social bonding in animal models. Intranasal OT is currently in clinical trials for use in disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. We examined long-term effects of intranasal OT given developmentally in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), a socially monogamous rodent, often used as an animal model to screen drugs that have therapeutic potential for social disorders. Methods: We treated voles with one of three dosages of intranasal OT, or saline, from day 21 (weaning) through day 42 (sexual maturity). We examined both social behavior immediately following administration, as well as long-term changes in social and anxiety behavior after treatment ceased. Group sizes varied from 8 to 15 voles (n = 89 voles total). Results: Treatment with OT resulted in acute increases in social behavior in male voles with familiar partners, as seen in humans. However, long-term developmental treatment with low doses of intranasal OT resulted in a deficit in partner preference behavior (a reduction of contact with a familiar opposite-sex partner, used to index pair-bond formation) by male voles. Conclusions: Long-term developmental treatment with OT may show results different to those predicted by short-term studies, as well as significant sex differences and dosage effects. Further animal study is crucial to determining safe and effective strategies for use of chronic intranasal OT, especially during development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-188
Number of pages9
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

Fingerprint

Arvicolinae
Oxytocin
Social Behavior
Animal Models
Pair Bond
Grassland
Autistic Disorder
Weaning
Sex Characteristics
Rodentia
Schizophrenia
Anxiety
Clinical Trials
Hormones

Keywords

  • Autism
  • intranasal
  • oxytocin
  • schizophrenia
  • social behavior
  • vasopressin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Bales, K. L., Perkeybile, A. M., Conley, O. G., Lee, M. H., Guoynes, C. D., Downing, G. M., ... Mendoza, S. P. (2013). Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles. Biological Psychiatry, 74(3), 180-188. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.08.025

Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles. / Bales, Karen L.; Perkeybile, Allison M.; Conley, Olivia G.; Lee, Meredith H.; Guoynes, Caleigh D.; Downing, Griffin M.; Yun, Catherine R.; Friedman, Marjorie Solomon; Jacob, Suma; Mendoza, Sally P.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 74, No. 3, 01.08.2013, p. 180-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bales, KL, Perkeybile, AM, Conley, OG, Lee, MH, Guoynes, CD, Downing, GM, Yun, CR, Friedman, MS, Jacob, S & Mendoza, SP 2013, 'Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles', Biological Psychiatry, vol. 74, no. 3, pp. 180-188. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.08.025
Bales, Karen L. ; Perkeybile, Allison M. ; Conley, Olivia G. ; Lee, Meredith H. ; Guoynes, Caleigh D. ; Downing, Griffin M. ; Yun, Catherine R. ; Friedman, Marjorie Solomon ; Jacob, Suma ; Mendoza, Sally P. / Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles. In: Biological Psychiatry. 2013 ; Vol. 74, No. 3. pp. 180-188.
@article{b6171844c0a0429a9db7c03171f5fe0f,
title = "Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles",
abstract = "Background: Oxytocin (OT) is a hormone shown to be involved in social bonding in animal models. Intranasal OT is currently in clinical trials for use in disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. We examined long-term effects of intranasal OT given developmentally in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), a socially monogamous rodent, often used as an animal model to screen drugs that have therapeutic potential for social disorders. Methods: We treated voles with one of three dosages of intranasal OT, or saline, from day 21 (weaning) through day 42 (sexual maturity). We examined both social behavior immediately following administration, as well as long-term changes in social and anxiety behavior after treatment ceased. Group sizes varied from 8 to 15 voles (n = 89 voles total). Results: Treatment with OT resulted in acute increases in social behavior in male voles with familiar partners, as seen in humans. However, long-term developmental treatment with low doses of intranasal OT resulted in a deficit in partner preference behavior (a reduction of contact with a familiar opposite-sex partner, used to index pair-bond formation) by male voles. Conclusions: Long-term developmental treatment with OT may show results different to those predicted by short-term studies, as well as significant sex differences and dosage effects. Further animal study is crucial to determining safe and effective strategies for use of chronic intranasal OT, especially during development.",
keywords = "Autism, intranasal, oxytocin, schizophrenia, social behavior, vasopressin",
author = "Bales, {Karen L.} and Perkeybile, {Allison M.} and Conley, {Olivia G.} and Lee, {Meredith H.} and Guoynes, {Caleigh D.} and Downing, {Griffin M.} and Yun, {Catherine R.} and Friedman, {Marjorie Solomon} and Suma Jacob and Mendoza, {Sally P.}",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.08.025",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "74",
pages = "180--188",
journal = "Biological Psychiatry",
issn = "0006-3223",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles

AU - Bales, Karen L.

AU - Perkeybile, Allison M.

AU - Conley, Olivia G.

AU - Lee, Meredith H.

AU - Guoynes, Caleigh D.

AU - Downing, Griffin M.

AU - Yun, Catherine R.

AU - Friedman, Marjorie Solomon

AU - Jacob, Suma

AU - Mendoza, Sally P.

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - Background: Oxytocin (OT) is a hormone shown to be involved in social bonding in animal models. Intranasal OT is currently in clinical trials for use in disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. We examined long-term effects of intranasal OT given developmentally in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), a socially monogamous rodent, often used as an animal model to screen drugs that have therapeutic potential for social disorders. Methods: We treated voles with one of three dosages of intranasal OT, or saline, from day 21 (weaning) through day 42 (sexual maturity). We examined both social behavior immediately following administration, as well as long-term changes in social and anxiety behavior after treatment ceased. Group sizes varied from 8 to 15 voles (n = 89 voles total). Results: Treatment with OT resulted in acute increases in social behavior in male voles with familiar partners, as seen in humans. However, long-term developmental treatment with low doses of intranasal OT resulted in a deficit in partner preference behavior (a reduction of contact with a familiar opposite-sex partner, used to index pair-bond formation) by male voles. Conclusions: Long-term developmental treatment with OT may show results different to those predicted by short-term studies, as well as significant sex differences and dosage effects. Further animal study is crucial to determining safe and effective strategies for use of chronic intranasal OT, especially during development.

AB - Background: Oxytocin (OT) is a hormone shown to be involved in social bonding in animal models. Intranasal OT is currently in clinical trials for use in disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. We examined long-term effects of intranasal OT given developmentally in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), a socially monogamous rodent, often used as an animal model to screen drugs that have therapeutic potential for social disorders. Methods: We treated voles with one of three dosages of intranasal OT, or saline, from day 21 (weaning) through day 42 (sexual maturity). We examined both social behavior immediately following administration, as well as long-term changes in social and anxiety behavior after treatment ceased. Group sizes varied from 8 to 15 voles (n = 89 voles total). Results: Treatment with OT resulted in acute increases in social behavior in male voles with familiar partners, as seen in humans. However, long-term developmental treatment with low doses of intranasal OT resulted in a deficit in partner preference behavior (a reduction of contact with a familiar opposite-sex partner, used to index pair-bond formation) by male voles. Conclusions: Long-term developmental treatment with OT may show results different to those predicted by short-term studies, as well as significant sex differences and dosage effects. Further animal study is crucial to determining safe and effective strategies for use of chronic intranasal OT, especially during development.

KW - Autism

KW - intranasal

KW - oxytocin

KW - schizophrenia

KW - social behavior

KW - vasopressin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84880015074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84880015074&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.08.025

DO - 10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.08.025

M3 - Article

C2 - 23079235

AN - SCOPUS:84880015074

VL - 74

SP - 180

EP - 188

JO - Biological Psychiatry

JF - Biological Psychiatry

SN - 0006-3223

IS - 3

ER -