Chronic exposure to ambient traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) alters gut microbial abundance and bile acid metabolism in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer's disease

Moumita Dutta, Kris M. Weigel, Kelley T. Patten, Anthony E. Valenzuela, Christopher Wallis, Keith J. Bein, Anthony Stein Wexler, Pamela J. Lein, Julia Yue Cui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) is linked to increased risk for age-related dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The gut microbiome is posited to influence AD risk, and an increase in microbial-derived secondary bile acids (BAs) is observed in AD patients. We recently reported that chronic exposure to ambient TRAP modified AD risk in a sex-dependent manner in the TgF344 AD (TG) rat. Objectives: In this study, we used samples from the same cohort to test our hypothesis that TRAP sex-dependently produces gut dysbiosis and increases secondary BAs to a larger extent in the TG rat relative to wildtype (WT) controls. Methods: Male and female TG and age-matched WT rats were exposed to either filtered air (FA) or TRAP from 28 days up to 15 months of age (n = 5–6). Tissue samples were collected after 9 or 14months of exposure. Results: At 10 months of age, TRAP tended to decrease the alpha diversity as well as the beneficial taxa Lactobacillus and Ruminococcus flavefaciens uniquely in male TG rats as determined by 16 S rDNA sequencing. A basal decrease in Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes (F/B) ratio was also noted in TG rats at 10 months. At 15 months of age, TRAP altered inflammation-related bacteria in the gut of female rats from both genotypes. BAs were more affected by chronic TRAP exposure in females, with a general trend of increase in host-produced unconjugated primary and microbiota-produced secondary BAs. Most of the mRNAs of the hepatic BA-processing genes were not altered by TRAP, except for a down-regulation of the BA-uptake transporter Ntcp in males. Conclusion: In conclusion, chronic TRAP exposure produced distinct gut dysbiosis and altered BA homeostasis in a sex and host genotype-specific manner.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)432-444
Number of pages13
JournalToxicology Reports
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Bile acid
  • Gut microbiome
  • Rat
  • Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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