Chronic consumption of a flavanol- and procyanindin-rich diet is associated with reduced levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in rat testes

Timothy J. Orozco, Janice F. Wang, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cocoa can contain a high concentration of flavanols and procyanidins which have been reported to have strong antioxidative activity. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5, 1, or 2% cocoa rich in flavanols for two weeks. Blood, liver, heart and testes were collected and analyzed for markers of oxidative damage. Plasma epicatechin concentrations, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8OH2′dG), and oxidized and reduced glutathione were quantitated by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma epicatechin concentrations increased in a dose-dependant fashion according to the amount of cocoa in the diet (128 nM-790 nM). Cocoa supplementation was associated with lower than normal concentrations of 8OH2′dG in the testes (0.590 + 0.40 vs. 0.328 + 0.29; p < 0.05). Liver and heart 8OH2′dG levels were unaffected by dietary treatment. In erythrocytes, the glutathione pool was significantly less oxidized in the cocoa fed group compared to controls (p < 0.05). In liver and testes, no differences in superoxide dismutase activities were detected. Concentrations of plasma F2-isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were similar in all groups. These results support the concept that a diet rich in flavanols and procyanidins can improve oxidant defense and reduce tissue markers for oxidative stress, although these effects can be tissue specific.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-110
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

Fingerprint

Cocoa
Nutrition
Testis
Rats
F2-Isoprostanes
Diet
Proanthocyanidins
Catechin
Liver
Plasmas
Glutathione
Glutathione Disulfide
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Tissue
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Oxidants
Oxidative stress
Superoxide Dismutase
Sprague Dawley Rats
Oxidative Stress

Keywords

  • 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine
  • Cocoa
  • Epicatechin
  • Flavanols
  • Flavonoids
  • Oxidative damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Chronic consumption of a flavanol- and procyanindin-rich diet is associated with reduced levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in rat testes. / Orozco, Timothy J.; Wang, Janice F.; Keen, Carl L.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 104-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c7c31e4c78094c6e827fb452ce19f4af,
title = "Chronic consumption of a flavanol- and procyanindin-rich diet is associated with reduced levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in rat testes",
abstract = "Cocoa can contain a high concentration of flavanols and procyanidins which have been reported to have strong antioxidative activity. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5, 1, or 2{\%} cocoa rich in flavanols for two weeks. Blood, liver, heart and testes were collected and analyzed for markers of oxidative damage. Plasma epicatechin concentrations, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8OH2′dG), and oxidized and reduced glutathione were quantitated by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma epicatechin concentrations increased in a dose-dependant fashion according to the amount of cocoa in the diet (128 nM-790 nM). Cocoa supplementation was associated with lower than normal concentrations of 8OH2′dG in the testes (0.590 + 0.40 vs. 0.328 + 0.29; p < 0.05). Liver and heart 8OH2′dG levels were unaffected by dietary treatment. In erythrocytes, the glutathione pool was significantly less oxidized in the cocoa fed group compared to controls (p < 0.05). In liver and testes, no differences in superoxide dismutase activities were detected. Concentrations of plasma F2-isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were similar in all groups. These results support the concept that a diet rich in flavanols and procyanidins can improve oxidant defense and reduce tissue markers for oxidative stress, although these effects can be tissue specific.",
keywords = "8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, Cocoa, Epicatechin, Flavanols, Flavonoids, Oxidative damage",
author = "Orozco, {Timothy J.} and Wang, {Janice F.} and Keen, {Carl L}",
year = "2003",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0955-2863(02)00273-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "104--110",
journal = "Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry",
issn = "0955-2863",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic consumption of a flavanol- and procyanindin-rich diet is associated with reduced levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in rat testes

AU - Orozco, Timothy J.

AU - Wang, Janice F.

AU - Keen, Carl L

PY - 2003/2/1

Y1 - 2003/2/1

N2 - Cocoa can contain a high concentration of flavanols and procyanidins which have been reported to have strong antioxidative activity. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5, 1, or 2% cocoa rich in flavanols for two weeks. Blood, liver, heart and testes were collected and analyzed for markers of oxidative damage. Plasma epicatechin concentrations, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8OH2′dG), and oxidized and reduced glutathione were quantitated by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma epicatechin concentrations increased in a dose-dependant fashion according to the amount of cocoa in the diet (128 nM-790 nM). Cocoa supplementation was associated with lower than normal concentrations of 8OH2′dG in the testes (0.590 + 0.40 vs. 0.328 + 0.29; p < 0.05). Liver and heart 8OH2′dG levels were unaffected by dietary treatment. In erythrocytes, the glutathione pool was significantly less oxidized in the cocoa fed group compared to controls (p < 0.05). In liver and testes, no differences in superoxide dismutase activities were detected. Concentrations of plasma F2-isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were similar in all groups. These results support the concept that a diet rich in flavanols and procyanidins can improve oxidant defense and reduce tissue markers for oxidative stress, although these effects can be tissue specific.

AB - Cocoa can contain a high concentration of flavanols and procyanidins which have been reported to have strong antioxidative activity. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing 0, 0.5, 1, or 2% cocoa rich in flavanols for two weeks. Blood, liver, heart and testes were collected and analyzed for markers of oxidative damage. Plasma epicatechin concentrations, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8OH2′dG), and oxidized and reduced glutathione were quantitated by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Plasma epicatechin concentrations increased in a dose-dependant fashion according to the amount of cocoa in the diet (128 nM-790 nM). Cocoa supplementation was associated with lower than normal concentrations of 8OH2′dG in the testes (0.590 + 0.40 vs. 0.328 + 0.29; p < 0.05). Liver and heart 8OH2′dG levels were unaffected by dietary treatment. In erythrocytes, the glutathione pool was significantly less oxidized in the cocoa fed group compared to controls (p < 0.05). In liver and testes, no differences in superoxide dismutase activities were detected. Concentrations of plasma F2-isoprostanes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were similar in all groups. These results support the concept that a diet rich in flavanols and procyanidins can improve oxidant defense and reduce tissue markers for oxidative stress, although these effects can be tissue specific.

KW - 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine

KW - Cocoa

KW - Epicatechin

KW - Flavanols

KW - Flavonoids

KW - Oxidative damage

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037298728&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037298728&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0955-2863(02)00273-5

DO - 10.1016/S0955-2863(02)00273-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 12667602

AN - SCOPUS:0037298728

VL - 14

SP - 104

EP - 110

JO - Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry

JF - Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry

SN - 0955-2863

IS - 2

ER -