Chromatic-spatial vision of the aging eye

John S Werner, Peter B. Delahunt, Joseph L. Hardy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The human visual system undergoes continuous anatomical, physiological and functional changes throughout the life span. There is also continuous change in the spectral distribution and intensity of light reaching the retina from infancy through senescence, primarily due to changes in the absorption of short-wave light by the lens. Despite these changes in the retinal stimulus and the signals leaving the retina for perceptual analysis, color appearance is relatively stable during aging as measured by broadband reflective or self-luminous samples, the wavelengths of unique blue and yellow, and the achromatic locus. Measures of ocular media density for younger and older observers show, indeed, that color appearance is independent of ocular media density. This may be explained by a renormalization process that was demonstrated by measuring the chromaticity of the achromatic point before and after cataract surgery. There was a shift following cataract surgery (removal of a brunescent lens) that was initially toward yellow in color space, but over the course of months, drifted back in the direction of the achromatic point before surgery. The spatial characteristics of color mechanisms were quantified for younger and older observers in terms of chromatic perceptive fields and the chromatic contrast sensitivity functions. Younger and older observers differed with small spots or with chromatic spatial gratings near threshold, but there were no significant differences with larger spots or suprathreshold spatial gratings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-234
Number of pages9
JournalOptical Review
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Chromatic contrast sensitivity
  • Color appearance
  • Ocular media
  • Photoreceptors
  • White point

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

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