Choreoathetosis in infants following cardiac surgery with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest

James A Brunberg, Donald B. Doty, Edward L. Reilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Choreoathetosis developed in four of 21 children after the surgical repair of congenital cardiac anomalies with the use of circulatory arrest for 40 to 58 minutes at nasopharyngeal temperatures of 16 to 20°C. Choreoathetosis developing four to six days postoperatively was of varying severity and duration; only one patient had significant persiting dyskinesias. It is suggested that neuronal domage may have resulted from altered cerebrovascular reflow following circulatory arrest or from cintinued metabolism during the ischemia and hypoxia of the arrest period. Preoperative cerebral injury and altered blood viscosity during hypothermic perfusion may further predispose these patients to postoperative neurologic complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-235
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1974
Externally publishedYes

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Hypothermia
Thoracic Surgery
Blood Viscosity
Dyskinesias
Nervous System
Ischemia
Perfusion
Temperature
Wounds and Injuries
Hypoxia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Choreoathetosis in infants following cardiac surgery with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. / Brunberg, James A; Doty, Donald B.; Reilly, Edward L.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 84, No. 2, 1974, p. 232-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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