Chondroitinase ABC treatment results in greater tensile properties of self-assembled tissue-engineered articular cartilage

Roman M. Natoli, Christopher M. Revell, Kyriacos A. Athanasiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collagen content and tensile properties of engineered articular cartilage have remained inferior to glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and compressive properties. Based on a cartilage explant study showing greater tensile properties after chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC) treatment, C-ABC as a strategy for cartilage tissue engineering was investigated. A scaffold-less approach was employed, wherein chondrocytes were seeded into non-adherent agarose molds. C-ABC was used to deplete GAG from constructs 2 weeks after initiating culture, followed by 2 weeks culture post-treatment. Staining for GAG and type I, II, and VI collagen and transmission electron microscopy were performed. Additionally, quantitative total collagen, type I and II collagen, and sulfated GAG content were measured, and compressive and tensile mechanical properties were evaluated. At 4 wks, C-ABC treated construct ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus increased 121% and 80% compared to untreated controls, reaching 0.5 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. These increases were accompanied by increased type II collagen concentration, without type I collagen. As GAG returned, compressive stiffness of C-ABC treated constructs recovered to be greater than 2 wk controls. C-ABC represents a novel method for engineering functional articular cartilage by departing from conventional anabolic approaches. These results may be applicable to other GAG-producing tissues functioning in a tensile capacity, such as the musculoskeletal fibrocartilages.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3119-3128
Number of pages10
JournalTissue Engineering - Part A
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chondroitin ABC Lyase
Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Tensile properties
Collagen
Glycosaminoglycans
Tissue
Collagen Type II
Collagen Type I
A73025
Collagen Type VI
Fibrocartilage
Tensile Strength
Molds
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Chondrocytes
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Tissue engineering
Sepharose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chondroitinase ABC treatment results in greater tensile properties of self-assembled tissue-engineered articular cartilage. / Natoli, Roman M.; Revell, Christopher M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part A, Vol. 15, No. 10, 01.10.2009, p. 3119-3128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Natoli, Roman M. ; Revell, Christopher M. ; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A. / Chondroitinase ABC treatment results in greater tensile properties of self-assembled tissue-engineered articular cartilage. In: Tissue Engineering - Part A. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 10. pp. 3119-3128.
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