Chlamydia trachomatis: Important relationships to race, contraception, lower genital tract infection, and Papanicolaou smear

Mary Ann Shafer, Arne Beck, Barbara Blain, Pamela Dole, Charles E. Irwin, Richard L Sweet, Julius Schachter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis is a common cause of sexually transmitted disease in adolescent girls. Of 366 adolescent patients screened, 15.3% were found to have chlamydial endocervical infections, with an infection rate of 23.3% in blacks, 14.3% in Hispanics, and 10.3% in whites (P=0.01, excess for blacks). Of Chlamydia-positive patients, 63.6% had a diagnosis of lower genital tract infection, compared with 35.4% of Chlamydia-negative patients (P=0.004). Oral contraceptive users had a higher prevalence of infection (23.8%) compared with those using a barrier method (16.2%) or with nonusers (9.3%) (P=0.004). Inflammatory changes on Papanicolaou smears were associated with chlamydial infection (P=0.0001). Other variables identified as risk factors for chlamydial infection included both a younger age at first intercourse (P=0.02) and more years of sexual activity (P=0.02). Chronologic, menarchal, and gynecologic age, biologic age of the cervix, the number of sexual partners in the last month and during a lifetime, and parity were not found to be associated with recovery of Chlamydia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-146
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of Pediatrics
Volume104
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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Reproductive Tract Infections
Papanicolaou Test
Chlamydia trachomatis
Contraception
Chlamydia
Infection
Sexual Partners
Coitus
Oral Contraceptives
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Parity
Hispanic Americans
Cervix Uteri
Sexual Behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Chlamydia trachomatis : Important relationships to race, contraception, lower genital tract infection, and Papanicolaou smear. / Shafer, Mary Ann; Beck, Arne; Blain, Barbara; Dole, Pamela; Irwin, Charles E.; Sweet, Richard L; Schachter, Julius.

In: The Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 104, No. 1, 1984, p. 141-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shafer, Mary Ann ; Beck, Arne ; Blain, Barbara ; Dole, Pamela ; Irwin, Charles E. ; Sweet, Richard L ; Schachter, Julius. / Chlamydia trachomatis : Important relationships to race, contraception, lower genital tract infection, and Papanicolaou smear. In: The Journal of Pediatrics. 1984 ; Vol. 104, No. 1. pp. 141-146.
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