Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy

Robin Diekmann, Øystein I. Helle, Cristina I. Øie, Peter McCourt, Thomas R Huser, Mark Schüttpelz, Balpreet S. Ahluwalia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Present optical nanoscopy techniques use a complex microscope for imaging and a simple glass slide to hold the sample. Here, we demonstrate the inverse: the use of a complex, but mass-producible optical chip, which hosts the sample and provides a waveguide for the illumination source, and a standard low-cost microscope to acquire super-resolved images via two different approaches. Waveguides composed of a material with high refractive-index contrast provide a strong evanescent field that is used for single-molecule switching and fluorescence excitation, thus enabling chip-based single-molecule localization microscopy. Additionally, multimode interference patterns induce spatial fluorescence intensity variations that enable fluctuation-based super-resolution imaging. As chip-based nanoscopy separates the illumination and detection light paths, total-internal-reflection fluorescence excitation is possible over a large field of view, with up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm being demonstrated. Using multicolour chip-based nanoscopy, we visualize fenestrations in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-328
Number of pages7
JournalNature Photonics
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

field of view
Fluorescence
chips
Waveguides
Microscopes
Lighting
fluorescence
Evanescent fields
Imaging techniques
Molecules
illumination
microscopes
Endothelial cells
waveguides
Liver
Light sources
Refractive index
Microscopic examination
chutes
liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Diekmann, R., Helle, Ø. I., Øie, C. I., McCourt, P., Huser, T. R., Schüttpelz, M., & Ahluwalia, B. S. (2017). Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy. Nature Photonics, 11(5), 322-328. https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2017.55

Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy. / Diekmann, Robin; Helle, Øystein I.; Øie, Cristina I.; McCourt, Peter; Huser, Thomas R; Schüttpelz, Mark; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S.

In: Nature Photonics, Vol. 11, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 322-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diekmann, R, Helle, ØI, Øie, CI, McCourt, P, Huser, TR, Schüttpelz, M & Ahluwalia, BS 2017, 'Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy', Nature Photonics, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 322-328. https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2017.55
Diekmann R, Helle ØI, Øie CI, McCourt P, Huser TR, Schüttpelz M et al. Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy. Nature Photonics. 2017 May 1;11(5):322-328. https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2017.55
Diekmann, Robin ; Helle, Øystein I. ; Øie, Cristina I. ; McCourt, Peter ; Huser, Thomas R ; Schüttpelz, Mark ; Ahluwalia, Balpreet S. / Chip-based wide field-of-view nanoscopy. In: Nature Photonics. 2017 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 322-328.
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