Chemokines and primary brain tumors

Shyam Rao, Mahil Rao, Nicole Warrington, Joshua B. Rubin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Normal development of the central nervous system (CNS) is critically dependent upon the coordinated expression of chemokines and their receptors in a spatially and temporally regulated fashion (reviewed in Klein and Rubin 2004; Li and Ransohoff 2008). During development, chemokines control progenitor cell migration (Bagri et al. 2002; Klein et al. 2001; Lu et al. 2002; Lu et al. 2001), proliferation (Klein et al. 2001), and survival (Chalasani et al. 2003a) as well as modulate differentiated cell functions such as axon pathfinding and fasciculation (Chalasani et al. 2003b; Chalasani et al. 2007). Thus, it should not be surprising to discover that chemokines and their receptors also contribute to the biology of CNS neoplasms. In this chapter we will primarily review studies that have defined the role that one chemokine, CXCL12, and its receptor, CXCR4, play in brain tumor biology and how this pathway is being targeted for brain tumor therapy. In addition, we will touch on the role that brain tumor-derived chemokines play in the recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of brain tumor growth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationChemokine Receptors and NeuroAIDS
Subtitle of host publicationBeyond Co-Receptor Function and Links to Other Neuropathologies
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages253-270
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781441907936
ISBN (Print)9781441907929
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Chemokines
Brain Neoplasms
Chemokine Receptors
CXCR4 Receptors
Chemokine CXCL12
Central Nervous System Neoplasms
Cell Movement
Stem Cells
Central Nervous System
Growth
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Rao, S., Rao, M., Warrington, N., & Rubin, J. B. (2010). Chemokines and primary brain tumors. In Chemokine Receptors and NeuroAIDS: Beyond Co-Receptor Function and Links to Other Neuropathologies (pp. 253-270). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0793-6_11

Chemokines and primary brain tumors. / Rao, Shyam; Rao, Mahil; Warrington, Nicole; Rubin, Joshua B.

Chemokine Receptors and NeuroAIDS: Beyond Co-Receptor Function and Links to Other Neuropathologies. Springer New York, 2010. p. 253-270.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Rao, S, Rao, M, Warrington, N & Rubin, JB 2010, Chemokines and primary brain tumors. in Chemokine Receptors and NeuroAIDS: Beyond Co-Receptor Function and Links to Other Neuropathologies. Springer New York, pp. 253-270. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0793-6_11
Rao S, Rao M, Warrington N, Rubin JB. Chemokines and primary brain tumors. In Chemokine Receptors and NeuroAIDS: Beyond Co-Receptor Function and Links to Other Neuropathologies. Springer New York. 2010. p. 253-270 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0793-6_11
Rao, Shyam ; Rao, Mahil ; Warrington, Nicole ; Rubin, Joshua B. / Chemokines and primary brain tumors. Chemokine Receptors and NeuroAIDS: Beyond Co-Receptor Function and Links to Other Neuropathologies. Springer New York, 2010. pp. 253-270
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