Chemical analysis, prevention, and low-level dosimetry of heterocyclic amines from cooked food

James S. Felton, Mark G. Knize, Michelle Roper, Esther Fultz, Nancy H. Shen, Ken W Turteltaub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Potent mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amines are produced from heated food derived from muscle. These compounds are present at part-per-billion levels and consist primarily of the amino-imidazoazaarene class of chemicals. Additional mutagens present in the meat are not as clearly characterized. Commercial fried-beef patties (hamburgers) have low levels of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (4,8-DiMeIQx), 0.1-0.68 ng/g meat for MeIQx and slightly lower for 4,8-DiMeIQx. The formation of these heterocyclic amines can be reduced by microwave pretreatment of meat, with the resulting liquid being poured off before frying. The Ames/Salmonella mutagenic activity was reduced to 5-10% of that of non-microwave-treated samples. MeIQx and DiMeIQx concentrations were reduced to 12% and 50% of levels in the non-microwave-treated samples, respectively. MeIQx adducts, as measured by accelerator mass spectrometry, were found to be linear with doses from 5 mg/kg to 500 ng/kg. Linear DNA binding at low doses is important for assuming linear risk estimation from the high animal-feeding doses causing cancer to the low human-dietary exposures. Extrapolating from the rodent TD50 dose to humans gives a maximum credible risk from consumption of heterocyclic amines of approximately I/1000 exposed individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Research
Volume52
Issue number7 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meat
Amines
2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoxaline
Food
Mutagens
Microwaves
Salmonella
Rodentia
Mass Spectrometry
Muscles
DNA
3,4,8-trimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoxalin-2-amine
Neoplasms
Red Meat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Felton, J. S., Knize, M. G., Roper, M., Fultz, E., Shen, N. H., & Turteltaub, K. W. (1992). Chemical analysis, prevention, and low-level dosimetry of heterocyclic amines from cooked food. Cancer Research, 52(7 SUPPL.).

Chemical analysis, prevention, and low-level dosimetry of heterocyclic amines from cooked food. / Felton, James S.; Knize, Mark G.; Roper, Michelle; Fultz, Esther; Shen, Nancy H.; Turteltaub, Ken W.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 52, No. 7 SUPPL., 1992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Felton, JS, Knize, MG, Roper, M, Fultz, E, Shen, NH & Turteltaub, KW 1992, 'Chemical analysis, prevention, and low-level dosimetry of heterocyclic amines from cooked food', Cancer Research, vol. 52, no. 7 SUPPL..
Felton, James S. ; Knize, Mark G. ; Roper, Michelle ; Fultz, Esther ; Shen, Nancy H. ; Turteltaub, Ken W. / Chemical analysis, prevention, and low-level dosimetry of heterocyclic amines from cooked food. In: Cancer Research. 1992 ; Vol. 52, No. 7 SUPPL.
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