Characterization of the Cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori from naturally infected rhesus macaques

Emma C. Skoog, Samuel L. Deck, Hasan D. Entwistle, Lori M. Hansen, Jay V Solnick

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori commonly infects the epithelial layer of the human stomach and in some individuals causes peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma or gastric lymphoma. Helicobacter pylori is a genetically diverse species, and the most important bacterial virulence factor that increases the risk of developing disease, versus asymptomatic colonization, is the cytotoxin associated gene pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Socially housed rhesus macaques are often naturally infected with H. pylori similar to that which colonizes humans, but little is known about the cagPAI. Here we show that H. pylori strains isolated from naturally infected rhesus macaques have a cagPAI very similar to that found in human clinical isolates, and like human isolates, it encodes a functional type IV secretion system. These results provide further support for the relevance of rhesus macaques as a valid experimental model for H. pylori infection in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberfnw275
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume363
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Animal model
  • Cag pathogenicity island
  • CagA
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Rhesus macaques
  • Type 4 secretion system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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