Characterization of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri in Western Kenya Utilizing a Novel Species-specific Real-time PCR Assay

Robin H. Miller, Clifford O. Obuya, Elizabeth W. Wanja, Bernhards Ogutu, John Waitumbi, Shirley Luckhart, V. Ann Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasmodium ovale is comprised of two genetically distinct subspecies, P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. Although P. ovale subspecies are similar based on morphology and geographical distribution, allelic differences indicate that P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri are genetically divergent. Additionally, potential clinical and latency duration differences between P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri demonstrate the need for investigation into the contribution of this neglected malaria parasite to the global malaria burden. In order to detect all P. ovale subspecies simultaneously, we developed an inclusive P. ovale-specific real-time PCR assay based on conserved regions between P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri in the reticulocyte binding protein 2 (rbp2) gene. Additionally, we characterized the P. ovale subspecies prevalence from 22 asymptomatic malaria infections using multilocus genotyping to discriminate P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. Our P. ovale rbp2 qPCR assay validation experiments demonstrated a linear dynamic range from 6.25 rbp2 plasmid copies/microliter to 100,000 rbp2 plasmid copies/microliter and a limit of detection of 1.5 rbp2 plasmid copies/microliter. Specificity experiments showed the ability of the rbp2 qPCR assay to detect low-levels of P. ovale in the presence of additional malaria parasite species, including P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae. We identified P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri in Western Kenya by DNA sequencing of the tryptophan-rich antigen gene, the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, and the rbp2 gene. Our novel P. ovale rbp2 qPCR assay detects P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri simultaneously and can be utilized to characterize the prevalence, distribution, and burden of P. ovale in malaria endemic regions. Using multilocus genotyping, we also provided the first description of the prevalence of P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri in Western Kenya, a region holoendemic for malaria transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Plasmodium ovale
Kenya
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Reticulocytes
Carrier Proteins
Malaria
Plasmids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Characterization of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri in Western Kenya Utilizing a Novel Species-specific Real-time PCR Assay. / Miller, Robin H.; Obuya, Clifford O.; Wanja, Elizabeth W.; Ogutu, Bernhards; Waitumbi, John; Luckhart, Shirley; Stewart, V. Ann.

In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Robin H. ; Obuya, Clifford O. ; Wanja, Elizabeth W. ; Ogutu, Bernhards ; Waitumbi, John ; Luckhart, Shirley ; Stewart, V. Ann. / Characterization of Plasmodium ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri in Western Kenya Utilizing a Novel Species-specific Real-time PCR Assay. In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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