Characterisation of headshaking syndrome--31 cases.

John E Madigan, S. A. Bell

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Headshaking is a maturity onset condition with the most commonly reported clinical signs being 'flipping' of the nose, nose rubbing, snorting or sneezing, and acting like a bee is flying up the nostril. A questionnaire was completed by owners of 31 horses with headshaking syndrome. The history, time of onset, clinical presentation and treatment of this condition were reported. Headshaking appeared to be light-stimulated in approximately 60% of the horses. The condition is seasonal and recurring in the majority of horses. Treatment with cyproheptadine produced improvement of symptoms in 76% of cases. The clinical signs are suggested to be compatible with neuropathic pain producing itching, tingling or electric like sensations in the face and muzzle area of affected horses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEquine veterinary journal. Supplement
Pages28-29
Number of pages2
Edition27
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Horses
Nose
Cyproheptadine
Sneezing
Bees
Neuralgia
Pruritus
History
Light
Therapeutics

Cite this

Madigan, J. E., & Bell, S. A. (1998). Characterisation of headshaking syndrome--31 cases. In Equine veterinary journal. Supplement (27 ed., pp. 28-29)

Characterisation of headshaking syndrome--31 cases. / Madigan, John E; Bell, S. A.

Equine veterinary journal. Supplement. 27. ed. 1998. p. 28-29.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Madigan, JE & Bell, SA 1998, Characterisation of headshaking syndrome--31 cases. in Equine veterinary journal. Supplement. 27 edn, pp. 28-29.
Madigan JE, Bell SA. Characterisation of headshaking syndrome--31 cases. In Equine veterinary journal. Supplement. 27 ed. 1998. p. 28-29
Madigan, John E ; Bell, S. A. / Characterisation of headshaking syndrome--31 cases. Equine veterinary journal. Supplement. 27. ed. 1998. pp. 28-29
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