Changes in heart rate and heart rate variability in Thoroughbreds during prolonged road transportation

Hajime Ohmura, Atsushi Hiraga, Hiroko Aida, Masayoshi Kuwahara, Hirokazu Tsubone, James H Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine whether evaluation of heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) during prolonged road transportation in horses provides a sensitive index of autonomic stimulation. Animals - Five 2-y ear-old Thoroughbreds. Procedure - ECGs were recorded as horses were transported for 21 hours in a 9-horse van. Heart rate, high-frequency (HF) power, low-frequency (LF) power, and LF-to-HF ratio from Fourier spectral analyses of ECGs were calculated and compared with values recorded during a 24-hour period of stall rest preceding transportation. Results - HR, HF power, and LF power had diurnal rhythms during stall rest but not during road transportation. Heart rate was higher and HF power and LF power lower during road transportation than stall rest, and HR, HF power, LF power, and LF-to-HF ratio all decreased with time during road transportation. Heart rate during stall rest was weakly and inversely associated with LF power, but during road transportation was strongly associated with LF power, HF power, and LF-to-HF ratio. Neither LF power nor HF power was correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest, but LF power was strongly and HF power weakly correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation. High-frequency power and LF power were significantly correlated with each other during stall rest and road transportation. Heart rate was significantly influenced by LF power and LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest (R2 = 0.40) and by HF power and LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation (R2 = 0.86). Conclusions and clinical relevance - HR is influenced by different sympathovagal mechanisms during stall rest, compared with during road transportation; HRV may be a sensitive indicator of stress in transported horses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)455-462
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

roads
heart rate
Heart Rate
Horses
Electrocardiography
Fourier Analysis
Circadian Rhythm
Ear
horses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Changes in heart rate and heart rate variability in Thoroughbreds during prolonged road transportation. / Ohmura, Hajime; Hiraga, Atsushi; Aida, Hiroko; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Tsubone, Hirokazu; Jones, James H.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 67, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 455-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ohmura, Hajime ; Hiraga, Atsushi ; Aida, Hiroko ; Kuwahara, Masayoshi ; Tsubone, Hirokazu ; Jones, James H. / Changes in heart rate and heart rate variability in Thoroughbreds during prolonged road transportation. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2006 ; Vol. 67, No. 3. pp. 455-462.
@article{440d8f05cf0c4052b6a784b0ef9c6e44,
title = "Changes in heart rate and heart rate variability in Thoroughbreds during prolonged road transportation",
abstract = "Objective - To determine whether evaluation of heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) during prolonged road transportation in horses provides a sensitive index of autonomic stimulation. Animals - Five 2-y ear-old Thoroughbreds. Procedure - ECGs were recorded as horses were transported for 21 hours in a 9-horse van. Heart rate, high-frequency (HF) power, low-frequency (LF) power, and LF-to-HF ratio from Fourier spectral analyses of ECGs were calculated and compared with values recorded during a 24-hour period of stall rest preceding transportation. Results - HR, HF power, and LF power had diurnal rhythms during stall rest but not during road transportation. Heart rate was higher and HF power and LF power lower during road transportation than stall rest, and HR, HF power, LF power, and LF-to-HF ratio all decreased with time during road transportation. Heart rate during stall rest was weakly and inversely associated with LF power, but during road transportation was strongly associated with LF power, HF power, and LF-to-HF ratio. Neither LF power nor HF power was correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest, but LF power was strongly and HF power weakly correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation. High-frequency power and LF power were significantly correlated with each other during stall rest and road transportation. Heart rate was significantly influenced by LF power and LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest (R2 = 0.40) and by HF power and LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation (R2 = 0.86). Conclusions and clinical relevance - HR is influenced by different sympathovagal mechanisms during stall rest, compared with during road transportation; HRV may be a sensitive indicator of stress in transported horses.",
author = "Hajime Ohmura and Atsushi Hiraga and Hiroko Aida and Masayoshi Kuwahara and Hirokazu Tsubone and Jones, {James H}",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
doi = "10.2460/ajvr.67.3.455",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "67",
pages = "455--462",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Changes in heart rate and heart rate variability in Thoroughbreds during prolonged road transportation

AU - Ohmura, Hajime

AU - Hiraga, Atsushi

AU - Aida, Hiroko

AU - Kuwahara, Masayoshi

AU - Tsubone, Hirokazu

AU - Jones, James H

PY - 2006/3

Y1 - 2006/3

N2 - Objective - To determine whether evaluation of heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) during prolonged road transportation in horses provides a sensitive index of autonomic stimulation. Animals - Five 2-y ear-old Thoroughbreds. Procedure - ECGs were recorded as horses were transported for 21 hours in a 9-horse van. Heart rate, high-frequency (HF) power, low-frequency (LF) power, and LF-to-HF ratio from Fourier spectral analyses of ECGs were calculated and compared with values recorded during a 24-hour period of stall rest preceding transportation. Results - HR, HF power, and LF power had diurnal rhythms during stall rest but not during road transportation. Heart rate was higher and HF power and LF power lower during road transportation than stall rest, and HR, HF power, LF power, and LF-to-HF ratio all decreased with time during road transportation. Heart rate during stall rest was weakly and inversely associated with LF power, but during road transportation was strongly associated with LF power, HF power, and LF-to-HF ratio. Neither LF power nor HF power was correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest, but LF power was strongly and HF power weakly correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation. High-frequency power and LF power were significantly correlated with each other during stall rest and road transportation. Heart rate was significantly influenced by LF power and LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest (R2 = 0.40) and by HF power and LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation (R2 = 0.86). Conclusions and clinical relevance - HR is influenced by different sympathovagal mechanisms during stall rest, compared with during road transportation; HRV may be a sensitive indicator of stress in transported horses.

AB - Objective - To determine whether evaluation of heart rate (HR) and HR variability (HRV) during prolonged road transportation in horses provides a sensitive index of autonomic stimulation. Animals - Five 2-y ear-old Thoroughbreds. Procedure - ECGs were recorded as horses were transported for 21 hours in a 9-horse van. Heart rate, high-frequency (HF) power, low-frequency (LF) power, and LF-to-HF ratio from Fourier spectral analyses of ECGs were calculated and compared with values recorded during a 24-hour period of stall rest preceding transportation. Results - HR, HF power, and LF power had diurnal rhythms during stall rest but not during road transportation. Heart rate was higher and HF power and LF power lower during road transportation than stall rest, and HR, HF power, LF power, and LF-to-HF ratio all decreased with time during road transportation. Heart rate during stall rest was weakly and inversely associated with LF power, but during road transportation was strongly associated with LF power, HF power, and LF-to-HF ratio. Neither LF power nor HF power was correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest, but LF power was strongly and HF power weakly correlated with LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation. High-frequency power and LF power were significantly correlated with each other during stall rest and road transportation. Heart rate was significantly influenced by LF power and LF-to-HF ratio during stall rest (R2 = 0.40) and by HF power and LF-to-HF ratio during road transportation (R2 = 0.86). Conclusions and clinical relevance - HR is influenced by different sympathovagal mechanisms during stall rest, compared with during road transportation; HRV may be a sensitive indicator of stress in transported horses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646345616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646345616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2460/ajvr.67.3.455

DO - 10.2460/ajvr.67.3.455

M3 - Article

C2 - 16506907

AN - SCOPUS:33646345616

VL - 67

SP - 455

EP - 462

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 3

ER -