Challenges of interprofessional team training

a qualitative analysis of residents' perceptions

Sandrijn van Schaik, Jennifer Plant, Bridget O’Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based interprofessional team training is thought to improve patient care. Participating teams often consist of both experienced providers and trainees, which likely impacts team dynamics, particularly when a resident leads the team. Although similar team composition is found in real-life, debriefing after simulations puts a spotlight on team interactions and in particular on residents in the role of team leader. The goal of the current study was to explore residents' perceptions of simulation-based interprofessional team training.

METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a study of residents in the pediatric residency training program at the University of California, San Francisco (United States) leading interprofessional teams in simulated resuscitations, followed by facilitated debriefing. Residents participated in individual, semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews within one month of the simulation. The original study aimed to examine residents' self-assessment of leadership skills, and during analysis we encountered numerous comments regarding the interprofessional nature of the simulation training. We therefore performed a secondary analysis of the interview transcripts. We followed an iterative process to create a coding scheme, and used interprofessional learning and practice as sensitizing concepts to extract relevant themes.

RESULTS: 16 residents participated in the study. Residents felt that simulated resuscitations were helpful but anxiety provoking, largely due to interprofessional dynamics. They embraced the interprofessional training opportunity and appreciated hearing other healthcare providers' perspectives, but questioned the value of interprofessional debriefing. They identified the need to maintain positive relationships with colleagues in light of the teams' complex hierarchy as a barrier to candid feedback.

DISCUSSION: Pediatric residents in our study appreciated the opportunity to participate in interprofessional team training but were conflicted about the value of feedback and debriefing in this setting. These data indicate that the optimal approach to such interprofessional education activities deserves further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-57
Number of pages6
JournalEducation for Health
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Resuscitation
Interviews
resident
Pediatrics
Education
San Francisco
Internship and Residency
Health Personnel
Hearing
Patient Care
Anxiety
Learning
simulation
secondary analysis
training opportunities
self-assessment
interview
trainee
patient care
training program

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Challenges of interprofessional team training : a qualitative analysis of residents' perceptions. / van Schaik, Sandrijn; Plant, Jennifer; O’Brien, Bridget.

In: Education for Health, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 52-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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