Challenges for the development of clinically-useful fluorescing diagnostic contrast agents for optical imaging

A radiologist's perspective

Robert C. Brasch, Laure Fournier, Vincenzo Lucidi, Kirill Berejnoi, Yanjun Fu, Jonathan Palley, Stavros G. Demos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The goal of this work is to highlight those unique aspects of contrast-enhanced diagnostic optical imaging (OI) that favor a broad clinical utilization of this emerging diagnostic technique and to illustrate certain identified challenges opposing the enthusiastic clinical welcome for the OI method. We consider the single most appealing feature of OI to be its much-touted exquisite sensitivity for the detection of near-infrared fluorescing (NIRF) probes, a sensitivity supporting the development of disease- and molecule-specific NIR diagnostic probes, akin to nuclear imaging but without the ionizing radiation and with superior spatial resolution. But a qualitative OI diagnostic examination, merely defining the presence or absence of NIRF signal, may not be sufficient. The signal must be measurable. A quantitative OI examination, capable of accurately assaying the tissue concentration of the fluorescing probe and changes in that probe concentration related to disease progression or treatment would be extremely valuable. We discuss here at least three challenges to quantitative diagnostic OI, a non-linear relationship between probe concentration and signal intensity, background signal in the form of tissue auto-fluorescence, and the requirement to define precise location and depth of the signal origin from within the subject.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsA.P. Savitsky, L.Y. Brovko, D.J. Bornhop, R. Raghavachari, S.I. Achilefu
Pages215-221
Number of pages7
Volume5329
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventGenetically Engineered and Optical Probes for Biomedical Applications II - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 24 2004Jan 27 2004

Other

OtherGenetically Engineered and Optical Probes for Biomedical Applications II
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period1/24/041/27/04

Fingerprint

Imaging techniques
probes
examination
assaying
sensitivity
Tissue
Infrared radiation
progressions
ionizing radiation
emerging
Ionizing radiation
spatial resolution
fluorescence
requirements
Fluorescence
Molecules
molecules

Keywords

  • Auto-fluorescence
  • Contrast agents
  • Diagnostic optical imaging
  • Signal localization
  • Signal quantification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Brasch, R. C., Fournier, L., Lucidi, V., Berejnoi, K., Fu, Y., Palley, J., & Demos, S. G. (2004). Challenges for the development of clinically-useful fluorescing diagnostic contrast agents for optical imaging: A radiologist's perspective. In A. P. Savitsky, L. Y. Brovko, D. J. Bornhop, R. Raghavachari, & S. I. Achilefu (Eds.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 5329, pp. 215-221) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.529648

Challenges for the development of clinically-useful fluorescing diagnostic contrast agents for optical imaging : A radiologist's perspective. / Brasch, Robert C.; Fournier, Laure; Lucidi, Vincenzo; Berejnoi, Kirill; Fu, Yanjun; Palley, Jonathan; Demos, Stavros G.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / A.P. Savitsky; L.Y. Brovko; D.J. Bornhop; R. Raghavachari; S.I. Achilefu. Vol. 5329 2004. p. 215-221.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Brasch, RC, Fournier, L, Lucidi, V, Berejnoi, K, Fu, Y, Palley, J & Demos, SG 2004, Challenges for the development of clinically-useful fluorescing diagnostic contrast agents for optical imaging: A radiologist's perspective. in AP Savitsky, LY Brovko, DJ Bornhop, R Raghavachari & SI Achilefu (eds), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 5329, pp. 215-221, Genetically Engineered and Optical Probes for Biomedical Applications II, San Jose, CA, United States, 1/24/04. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.529648
Brasch RC, Fournier L, Lucidi V, Berejnoi K, Fu Y, Palley J et al. Challenges for the development of clinically-useful fluorescing diagnostic contrast agents for optical imaging: A radiologist's perspective. In Savitsky AP, Brovko LY, Bornhop DJ, Raghavachari R, Achilefu SI, editors, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 5329. 2004. p. 215-221 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.529648
Brasch, Robert C. ; Fournier, Laure ; Lucidi, Vincenzo ; Berejnoi, Kirill ; Fu, Yanjun ; Palley, Jonathan ; Demos, Stavros G. / Challenges for the development of clinically-useful fluorescing diagnostic contrast agents for optical imaging : A radiologist's perspective. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / A.P. Savitsky ; L.Y. Brovko ; D.J. Bornhop ; R. Raghavachari ; S.I. Achilefu. Vol. 5329 2004. pp. 215-221
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