Challenges and advantages in wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the human retinal and choroidal vasculature at 1.7-MHz A-scan rate

Raju Poddar, Justin V. Migacz, Daniel M. Schwartz, John S Werner, Iwona Gorczynska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present noninvasive, three-dimensional, depth-resolved imaging of human retinal and choroidal blood circulation with a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system at 1065-nm center wavelength. Motion contrast OCT imaging was performed with the phase-variance OCT angiography method. A Fourier-domain mode-locked light source was used to enable an imaging rate of 1.7 MHz. We experimentally demonstrate the challenges and advantages of wide-field OCT angiography (OCTA). In the discussion, we consider acquisition time, scanning area, scanning density, and their influence on visualization of selected features of the retinal and choroidal vascular networks. The OCTA imaging was performed with a field of view of 16 deg (5 mm × 5 mm) and 30 deg (9 mm × 9 mm). Data were presented in en face projections generated from single volumes and in en face projection mosaics generated from up to 4 datasets. OCTA imaging at 1.7 MHz A-scan rate was compared with results obtained from a commercial OCTA instrument and with conventional ophthalmic diagnostic methods: fundus photography, fluorescein, and indocyanine green angiography. Comparison of images obtained from all methods is demonstrated using the same eye of a healthy volunteer. For example, imaging of retinal pathology is presented in three cases of advanced age-related macular degeneration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106018
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume22
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Angiography
angiography
Optical tomography
tomography
Imaging techniques
projection
blood circulation
Scanning
Indocyanine Green
scanning
degeneration
photography
Hemodynamics
pathology
Photography
Pathology
Fluorescein
field of view
Light sources
acquisition

Keywords

  • choroidal blood flow
  • Fourier-domain mode-locked laser
  • medical and biological imaging
  • ophthalmic optics and devices
  • ophthalmology
  • optical coherence tomography
  • optical coherence tomographyangiography
  • retinal blood flow
  • swept-source optical coherence tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Challenges and advantages in wide-field optical coherence tomography angiography imaging of the human retinal and choroidal vasculature at 1.7-MHz A-scan rate. / Poddar, Raju; Migacz, Justin V.; Schwartz, Daniel M.; Werner, John S; Gorczynska, Iwona.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 22, No. 10, 106018, 01.10.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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