Cerebral blood oxygenation measurement based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence

Sava Sakadžić, Emmanuel Roussakis, Mohammad A. Yaseen, Emiri T. Mandeville, Vivek Srinivasan, Ken Arai, Svetlana Ruvinskaya, Weicheng Wu, Anna Devor, Eng H. Lo, Sergei A. Vinogradov, David A. Boas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring of the spatiotemporal characteristics of cerebral blood and tissue oxygenation is crucial for better understanding of the neuro-metabolic-vascular relationship. Development of new pO2 measurement modalities with simultaneous monitoring of pO2 in larger fields of view with higher spatial and/or temporal resolution will enable greater insight into the functioning of the normal brain and will also have significant impact on diagnosis and treatment of neurovascular diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and head injury. Optical imaging modalities have shown a great potential to provide high spatiotemporal resolution and quantitative imaging of pO2 based on hemoglobin absorption in visible and near infrared range of optical spectrum. However, multispectral measurement of cerebral blood oxygenation relies on photon migration through the highly scattering brain tissue. Estimation and modeling of tissue optical parameters, which may undergo dynamic changes during the experiment, is typically required for accurate estimation of blood oxygenation. On the other hand, estimation of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence should not be significantly affected by the changes in the optical parameters of the tissue and provides an absolute measure of pO2. Experimental systems that utilize oxygen-sensitive dyes have been demonstrated in in vivo studies of the perfused tissue as well as for monitoring the oxygen content in tissue cultures, showing that phosphorescence quenching is a potent technology capable of accurate oxygen imaging in the physiological pO2 range. Here we demonstrate with two different imaging modalities how to perform measurement of pO2 in cortical vasculature based on phosphorescence lifetime imaging. In first demonstration we present wide field of view imaging of pO2 at the cortical surface of a rat. This imaging modality has relatively simple experimental setup based on a CCD camera and a pulsed green laser. An example of monitoring the cortical spreading depression based on phosphorescence lifetime of Oxyphor R3 dye was presented. In second demonstration we present a high resolution two-photon pO2 imaging in cortical micro vasculature of a mouse. The experimental setup includes a custom built 2-photon microscope with femtosecond laser, electro-optic modulator, and photon-counting photo multiplier tube. We present an example of imaging the pO2 heterogeneity in the cortical microvasculature including capillaries, using a novel PtP-C343 dye with enhanced 2-photon excitation cross section.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere1694
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number51
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phosphorescence
Oxygenation
Quenching
Photons
Blood
Oxygen
Imaging techniques
Coloring Agents
Tissue
Lasers
Dyes
Monitoring
Cortical Spreading Depression
Partial Pressure
Optical Imaging
Brain
Demonstrations
Microvessels
Craniocerebral Trauma
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • Blood
  • Brain
  • Imaging
  • Issue 51
  • Neuroscience
  • Oxygenation
  • Phosphorescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Sakadžić, S., Roussakis, E., Yaseen, M. A., Mandeville, E. T., Srinivasan, V., Arai, K., ... Boas, D. A. (2011). Cerebral blood oxygenation measurement based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence. Journal of Visualized Experiments, (51), [e1694]. https://doi.org/10.3791/1694

Cerebral blood oxygenation measurement based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence. / Sakadžić, Sava; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Srinivasan, Vivek; Arai, Ken; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana; Wu, Weicheng; Devor, Anna; Lo, Eng H.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 51, e1694, 01.01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sakadžić, S, Roussakis, E, Yaseen, MA, Mandeville, ET, Srinivasan, V, Arai, K, Ruvinskaya, S, Wu, W, Devor, A, Lo, EH, Vinogradov, SA & Boas, DA 2011, 'Cerebral blood oxygenation measurement based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence', Journal of Visualized Experiments, no. 51, e1694. https://doi.org/10.3791/1694
Sakadžić, Sava ; Roussakis, Emmanuel ; Yaseen, Mohammad A. ; Mandeville, Emiri T. ; Srinivasan, Vivek ; Arai, Ken ; Ruvinskaya, Svetlana ; Wu, Weicheng ; Devor, Anna ; Lo, Eng H. ; Vinogradov, Sergei A. ; Boas, David A. / Cerebral blood oxygenation measurement based on oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence. In: Journal of Visualized Experiments. 2011 ; No. 51.
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