Central and peripheral airway/alveolar sites of exhaled nitric oxide in acute asthma

Arthur F. Gelb, Steven George, Philip E. Silkoff, Anita Krishnan, Christine Fraser, Colleen Flynn Taylor, Chris M. Shinar, Tamara Maginot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Central airway nitric oxide flux (J′awNO) and peripheral airway/alveolar nitric oxide concentration (CANO) during asthma exacerbation has not been investigated after correction for axial NO back-diffusion. Methods: After measuring exhaled NO (fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO); ppb) at 50, 100, 150 and 200 ml/s, J′awNO (nl/s) and CANO (ppb) were calculated using the two-compartment model and corrected for axial NO back-diffusion. Fifteen (8 males), non-smoking, patients with moderate-to-severe treated (inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and inhaled long-acting β2-agonist (LABA)) asthma, age 57±13 years (mean±SD), were studied at baseline, during exacerbation prior to oral corticosteroid, and during recovery after an 8 day tapering prednisone course. Based on earlier asthma studies without correction, it was hypothesised that with correction for NO axial back-diffusion, the incidence of abnormal J′awNO and C ANO at baseline and after exacerbation would be ≥30% in 15 patients with asthma with 80% power. Results: At baseline when clinically stable, after 180 μg of albuterol, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1; litres) was 78±26% predicted (p=0.009) with increased FENO at 50 ml/s (p=0.01) and J′awNO (p=0.02), but CANO was normal compared with the controls. During exacerbation FEV1 (litres) was 57±20% predicted (p=0.02), with increased FENO at 50 ml/s (p=0.01) and J′awNO (p=0.004), but CANO was normal. Recovery results were similar to baseline. Two of 15 patients with asthma always had normal exhaled NO gas exchange. Conclusions: The central airways were the major site of abnormal NO flux in 13 of 15 patients with moderate - severe asthma when stable and during exacerbation and could be easily detected with abnormal FENO at 50 ml/s. CANO was normal. Clinical trial number: NCT00576069.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-625
Number of pages7
JournalThorax
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Nitric Oxide
Asthma
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Albuterol
Forced Expiratory Volume
Prednisone
Gases
Clinical Trials
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Gelb, A. F., George, S., Silkoff, P. E., Krishnan, A., Fraser, C., Taylor, C. F., ... Maginot, T. (2010). Central and peripheral airway/alveolar sites of exhaled nitric oxide in acute asthma. Thorax, 65(7), 619-625. https://doi.org/10.1136/thx.2009.132696

Central and peripheral airway/alveolar sites of exhaled nitric oxide in acute asthma. / Gelb, Arthur F.; George, Steven; Silkoff, Philip E.; Krishnan, Anita; Fraser, Christine; Taylor, Colleen Flynn; Shinar, Chris M.; Maginot, Tamara.

In: Thorax, Vol. 65, No. 7, 01.01.2010, p. 619-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gelb, AF, George, S, Silkoff, PE, Krishnan, A, Fraser, C, Taylor, CF, Shinar, CM & Maginot, T 2010, 'Central and peripheral airway/alveolar sites of exhaled nitric oxide in acute asthma', Thorax, vol. 65, no. 7, pp. 619-625. https://doi.org/10.1136/thx.2009.132696
Gelb, Arthur F. ; George, Steven ; Silkoff, Philip E. ; Krishnan, Anita ; Fraser, Christine ; Taylor, Colleen Flynn ; Shinar, Chris M. ; Maginot, Tamara. / Central and peripheral airway/alveolar sites of exhaled nitric oxide in acute asthma. In: Thorax. 2010 ; Vol. 65, No. 7. pp. 619-625.
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abstract = "Introduction: Central airway nitric oxide flux (J′awNO) and peripheral airway/alveolar nitric oxide concentration (CANO) during asthma exacerbation has not been investigated after correction for axial NO back-diffusion. Methods: After measuring exhaled NO (fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO); ppb) at 50, 100, 150 and 200 ml/s, J′awNO (nl/s) and CANO (ppb) were calculated using the two-compartment model and corrected for axial NO back-diffusion. Fifteen (8 males), non-smoking, patients with moderate-to-severe treated (inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and inhaled long-acting β2-agonist (LABA)) asthma, age 57±13 years (mean±SD), were studied at baseline, during exacerbation prior to oral corticosteroid, and during recovery after an 8 day tapering prednisone course. Based on earlier asthma studies without correction, it was hypothesised that with correction for NO axial back-diffusion, the incidence of abnormal J′awNO and C ANO at baseline and after exacerbation would be ≥30{\%} in 15 patients with asthma with 80{\%} power. Results: At baseline when clinically stable, after 180 μg of albuterol, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1; litres) was 78±26{\%} predicted (p=0.009) with increased FENO at 50 ml/s (p=0.01) and J′awNO (p=0.02), but CANO was normal compared with the controls. During exacerbation FEV1 (litres) was 57±20{\%} predicted (p=0.02), with increased FENO at 50 ml/s (p=0.01) and J′awNO (p=0.004), but CANO was normal. Recovery results were similar to baseline. Two of 15 patients with asthma always had normal exhaled NO gas exchange. Conclusions: The central airways were the major site of abnormal NO flux in 13 of 15 patients with moderate - severe asthma when stable and during exacerbation and could be easily detected with abnormal FENO at 50 ml/s. CANO was normal. Clinical trial number: NCT00576069.",
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AU - George, Steven

AU - Silkoff, Philip E.

AU - Krishnan, Anita

AU - Fraser, Christine

AU - Taylor, Colleen Flynn

AU - Shinar, Chris M.

AU - Maginot, Tamara

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N2 - Introduction: Central airway nitric oxide flux (J′awNO) and peripheral airway/alveolar nitric oxide concentration (CANO) during asthma exacerbation has not been investigated after correction for axial NO back-diffusion. Methods: After measuring exhaled NO (fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO); ppb) at 50, 100, 150 and 200 ml/s, J′awNO (nl/s) and CANO (ppb) were calculated using the two-compartment model and corrected for axial NO back-diffusion. Fifteen (8 males), non-smoking, patients with moderate-to-severe treated (inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and inhaled long-acting β2-agonist (LABA)) asthma, age 57±13 years (mean±SD), were studied at baseline, during exacerbation prior to oral corticosteroid, and during recovery after an 8 day tapering prednisone course. Based on earlier asthma studies without correction, it was hypothesised that with correction for NO axial back-diffusion, the incidence of abnormal J′awNO and C ANO at baseline and after exacerbation would be ≥30% in 15 patients with asthma with 80% power. Results: At baseline when clinically stable, after 180 μg of albuterol, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1; litres) was 78±26% predicted (p=0.009) with increased FENO at 50 ml/s (p=0.01) and J′awNO (p=0.02), but CANO was normal compared with the controls. During exacerbation FEV1 (litres) was 57±20% predicted (p=0.02), with increased FENO at 50 ml/s (p=0.01) and J′awNO (p=0.004), but CANO was normal. Recovery results were similar to baseline. Two of 15 patients with asthma always had normal exhaled NO gas exchange. Conclusions: The central airways were the major site of abnormal NO flux in 13 of 15 patients with moderate - severe asthma when stable and during exacerbation and could be easily detected with abnormal FENO at 50 ml/s. CANO was normal. Clinical trial number: NCT00576069.

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