Cellular and humoral mechanisms of osteoclast formation in Ewing's sarcoma

Y. S. Lau, Iannis Adamopoulos, A. Sabokbar, H. Giele, C. L M H Gibbons, N. A. Athanasou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cellular mechanisms that account for tumour osteolysis associated with Ewing's sarcoma are uncertain. Osteoclasts are marrow-derived multinucleated cells (MNCs) that effect tumour osteolysis. Osteoclasts are known to form from macrophages by both receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In this study, our aim has been to determine whether tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from Ewing's sarcoma are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts and to characterise the cellular and humoral mechanisms whereby this occurs. Tumour-associated macrophages were isolated from two Ewing's sarcomas and cultured on both coverslips and dentine slices for up to 21 days with soluble RANKL and macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Osteoclast formation from TAMs (CD14+) was evidenced by the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and vitronectin receptor (VNR)-positive MNCs, which were capable of carrying out lacunar resorption. This osteoclast formation was inhibited by the addition of bisphosphonates. Both Ewing's sarcoma-derived fibroblasts and some bone stromal cells expressed RANKL and supported osteoclast formation by a contact-dependent mechanism. We also found that osteoclast differentiation occurred when Ewing's TAMs were cultured with tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the presence of M-CSF and that TC71 Ewing's sarcoma cells stimulated osteoclast formation through the release of a soluble factor, the action of which was abolished by an antibody to TNF-α. These results indicate that TAMs in Ewing's sarcoma are capable of osteoclast differentiation by both RANKL-dependent and TNF-α-dependent mechanisms and that Ewing's sarcoma cells produce osteoclastogenic factor(s). Our findings suggest that anti-resorptive and anti-osteoclastogenic therapies may be useful in inhibiting the osteolysis of Ewing's sarcoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1716-1722
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume96
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 4 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ewing's Sarcoma
Osteoclasts
RANK Ligand
Macrophages
Osteolysis
Neoplasms
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Integrin alphaVbeta3
Diphosphonates
Dentin
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Stromal Cells
Fibroblasts
Bone Marrow
Bone and Bones
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Bone resorption
  • Ewing's sarcoma
  • Macrophage
  • Osteoclast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Lau, Y. S., Adamopoulos, I., Sabokbar, A., Giele, H., Gibbons, C. L. M. H., & Athanasou, N. A. (2007). Cellular and humoral mechanisms of osteoclast formation in Ewing's sarcoma. British Journal of Cancer, 96(11), 1716-1722. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6603774

Cellular and humoral mechanisms of osteoclast formation in Ewing's sarcoma. / Lau, Y. S.; Adamopoulos, Iannis; Sabokbar, A.; Giele, H.; Gibbons, C. L M H; Athanasou, N. A.

In: British Journal of Cancer, Vol. 96, No. 11, 04.06.2007, p. 1716-1722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lau, YS, Adamopoulos, I, Sabokbar, A, Giele, H, Gibbons, CLMH & Athanasou, NA 2007, 'Cellular and humoral mechanisms of osteoclast formation in Ewing's sarcoma', British Journal of Cancer, vol. 96, no. 11, pp. 1716-1722. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6603774
Lau, Y. S. ; Adamopoulos, Iannis ; Sabokbar, A. ; Giele, H. ; Gibbons, C. L M H ; Athanasou, N. A. / Cellular and humoral mechanisms of osteoclast formation in Ewing's sarcoma. In: British Journal of Cancer. 2007 ; Vol. 96, No. 11. pp. 1716-1722.
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