Cell signaling in yeast sporulation

JoAnne Engebrecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gametogenesis is essential for the propagation of all sexually reproducing organisms and consists of halving the chromosome number through meiosis, and the subsequent packaging of the haploid products into gametes. Meiosis and gamete formation must be tightly coupled to ensure the formation of viable progeny; perturbations result in infertility, inviability, and birth defects. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sexual reproduction occurs via sporulation and is similar in many respects to gametogenesis in mammals. An increasing number of conserved signaling molecules have been shown to be essential for yeast sporulation; recent studies reveal molecular insights into how these molecules regulate this intricate differentiation program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-328
Number of pages4
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume306
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Cell signaling
Gametogenesis
Meiosis
Germ Cells
Yeast
Yeasts
Haploidy
Product Packaging
Infertility
Reproduction
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Mammals
Molecules
Chromosomes
Packaging
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Cell signaling in yeast sporulation. / Engebrecht, JoAnne.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 306, No. 2, 27.06.2003, p. 325-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Engebrecht, JoAnne. / Cell signaling in yeast sporulation. In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 2003 ; Vol. 306, No. 2. pp. 325-328.
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