Cefadroxil in the horse: pharmacokinetics and in vitro antibacterial activity.

William D Wilson, J. D. Baggot, P. J. Adamson, D. C. Hirsh, S. K. Hietala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Sodium cefadroxil was administered as a single intravenous dose (25 mg/kg) to six healthy adult mares. Plasma samples were collected over a 24-h period and cefadroxil concentrations were measured by microbiological assay. The pharmacokinetic behavior of the drug was appropriately described in terms of a one-compartment open model. Values for the major pharmacokinetic terms were: extrapolated initial plasma concentration = 59.2 +/- 15.0 micrograms/ml; half-life = 46 +/- 20 min; apparent volume of distribution = 462 +/- 191 ml/kg; and body clearance = 7.0 +/- 0.6 ml/min.kg. In a subsequent study, a suspension of cefadroxil monohydrate was administered intragastrically (25 mg/kg) to the same six horses. Plasma concentrations of the drug peaked at 1-2 h but, in general, absorption was both poor and inconsistent. The data were unsuitable for determination of cefadroxil bioavailability from this oral dosage form. Ninety-nine isolates of eleven bacterial species obtained from clinically ill horses were tested for susceptibility to cefadroxil. All strains of Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus zooepidemicus, coagulase-positive staphylococci, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and five out of six strains of Actinobacillus suis were highly susceptible to the drug (MIC less than 4 micrograms/ml). Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella sp. showed intermediate susceptibility (MIC 4-16 micrograms/ml), while all isolates of Corynebacterium (Rhodococcus) equi, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa proved to be highly resistant to cefadroxil (MIC greater than 128 micrograms/ml).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-253
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume8
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1985

Fingerprint

Cefadroxil
pharmacokinetics
Horses
Pharmacokinetics
horses
Streptococcus equi
Rhodococcus equi
drugs
Actinobacillus suis
Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus
Enterobacter cloacae
coagulase positive staphylococci
Corynebacterium
Coagulase
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Dosage Forms
dosage
Staphylococcus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Cefadroxil in the horse : pharmacokinetics and in vitro antibacterial activity. / Wilson, William D; Baggot, J. D.; Adamson, P. J.; Hirsh, D. C.; Hietala, S. K.

In: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 8, No. 3, 09.1985, p. 246-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, William D ; Baggot, J. D. ; Adamson, P. J. ; Hirsh, D. C. ; Hietala, S. K. / Cefadroxil in the horse : pharmacokinetics and in vitro antibacterial activity. In: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 1985 ; Vol. 8, No. 3. pp. 246-253.
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