Caregiver characteristics and outcomes associated with level of care complexity for older adults

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Care in the home is increasingly complex, with family caregivers now expected to take on aspects of care previously managed by nurses and other health professionals. In a national sample of caregivers of older adults, we examined predictors and outcomes of level of care (low, medium, high) based on caregiving hours and counts of activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs supported. Characteristics associated with high level of care include Hispanic or “other” race/ethnicity, being unemployed, and specific care recipient conditions (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, cancer, mobility limitations). High compared to low level of care is also associated with caregiving difficulty and unmet needs. These findings underscore the need for targeted interventions and nursing research to further understand the features and dynamics of care complexity. Such research can inform family-centered interventions, health care system redesign, and health policies to support family caregivers of older adults engaged in complex care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalResearch in Gerontological Nursing
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Gerontology
  • Health Policy
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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