Cardiovascular and respiratory effects of incremental doses of dopamine and phenylephrine in the management of isoflurane-induced hypotension in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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Abstract

Objective-To determine cardiopulmonary effects of incremental doses of dopamine and phenylephrine during isoflurane-induced hypotension in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Animals-6 adult cats with severe naturally occurring HCM. Procedures-Each cat was anesthetized twice (once for dopamine treatment and once for phenylephrine treatment; treatment order was randomized). Hypotension was induced by increasing isoflurane concentration. Cardiopulmonary data, including measurement of plasma concentration of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), were obtained before anesthesia, 20 minutes after onset of hypotension, and 20 minutes after each incremental infusion of dopamine (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg/min) or phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg/min). Results-Mean ± SD end-tidal isoflurane concentration for dopamine and phenylephrine was 2.44 ± 0.05% and 2.48 ± 0.04%, respectively. Cardiac index and tissue oxygen delivery were significantly increased after administration of dopamine, compared with results after administration of phenylephrine. Systemic vascular resistance index was significantly increased after administration of phenylephrine, compared with results after administration of dopamine. Oxygen consumption remained unchanged for both treatments. Systemic and pulmonary arterial blood pressures were increased after administration of both dopamine and phenylephrine. Acid-base status and blood lactate concentration did not change and were not different between treatments. The cTnI concentration increased during anesthesia and infusion of dopamine and phenylephrine but did not differ significantly between treatments. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Dopamine and phenylephrine induced dose-dependent increases in systemic and pulmonary blood pressure, but only dopamine resulted in increased cardiac output. Hypotension and infusions of dopamine and phenylephrine caused significant increases in cTnI concentrations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)908-916
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume73
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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