Cardiac troponin I in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

William E. Herndon, Mark D Kittleson, Karen Sanderson, Kenneth J. Drobatz, Craig A. Clifford, Anna Gelzer, Nuala J. Summerfield, Annika Linde, Meg M. Sleeper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Measurement of plasma cardiac troponin I concentration ([cTnI]) is a sensitive and specific means for detecting myocardial damage in many mammalian species. Studies have shown that [cTnI] increases rapidly after cardiomyocyte injury. The molecular structure of cTnI is highly conserved across species, and current assays developed for its detection in humans have been validated in many species. In this study, [cTnI] was quantified using a 2-site sandwich assay in plasma of healthy control cats (n = 33) and cats with moderate to severe hypertrophie cardiomyopathy (HCM) (n = 20). [cTnI] was significantly higher in cats with HCM (median, 0.66 ng/mL; range, 0.05-10.93 ng/mL) as compared with normal cats (median, <0.03 ng/mL; range. <0.03-0.16 ng/mL) (P < .0001). An increase in [cTnI] was also highly sensitive (sensitivity = 85%) and specific (specificity = 97%) for differentiating cats with moderate to severe HCM from normal cats. [cTnI] was weakly correlated with diastolic thickness of the left ventricular free wall (r2 = .354; P = .009) but not with the diastolic thickness of the interventricular septum (P = .8467) or the left atrium: aorta ratio (P = .0652). Furthermore, cats with congestive heart failure at the time of cTnI analysis had a significantly higher [cTnI] than did cats that had never had heart failure and those whose heart failure was controlled at the time of analysis (P = .0095 and P = .0201, respectively). These data indicate that cats with HCM have ongoing myocardial damage. Although the origin of this damage is unknown, it most likely explains the replacement fibrosis that is consistently identified in cats with moderate to severe HCM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-564
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume16
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Troponin I
Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy
cardiomyopathy
Felidae
Cats
cats
Cardiomyopathies
heart failure
Heart Failure
troponin I
assays
sandwiches
aorta
Molecular Structure
Heart Atria
fibrosis
Cardiac Myocytes
chemical structure
Aorta
Fibrosis

Keywords

  • Congestive heart failure
  • Ischemia
  • Protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Herndon, W. E., Kittleson, M. D., Sanderson, K., Drobatz, K. J., Clifford, C. A., Gelzer, A., ... Sleeper, M. M. (2002). Cardiac troponin I in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 16(5), 558-564.

Cardiac troponin I in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. / Herndon, William E.; Kittleson, Mark D; Sanderson, Karen; Drobatz, Kenneth J.; Clifford, Craig A.; Gelzer, Anna; Summerfield, Nuala J.; Linde, Annika; Sleeper, Meg M.

In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 558-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herndon, WE, Kittleson, MD, Sanderson, K, Drobatz, KJ, Clifford, CA, Gelzer, A, Summerfield, NJ, Linde, A & Sleeper, MM 2002, 'Cardiac troponin I in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy', Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 558-564.
Herndon WE, Kittleson MD, Sanderson K, Drobatz KJ, Clifford CA, Gelzer A et al. Cardiac troponin I in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2002 Sep;16(5):558-564.
Herndon, William E. ; Kittleson, Mark D ; Sanderson, Karen ; Drobatz, Kenneth J. ; Clifford, Craig A. ; Gelzer, Anna ; Summerfield, Nuala J. ; Linde, Annika ; Sleeper, Meg M. / Cardiac troponin I in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 558-564.
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