Cardiac size and VO2maxdo not decrease after short-term exercise cessation

Eileen M. Cullinane, Stanley P. Sady, Louise Vadeboncoeur, Michael Burke, Paul D. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

CULLINANE, E. M., S. P. SADY, L. VADEBONCOEUR, M. BURKE, AND P. D. THOMPSON. Cardiac size and V02irax do not decrease alter short-term exercise cessation. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc, Vol. 18, No. 4, pp. 420-424, 1986. We measured maximum oxygen uptake, estimated changes in plasma volume, and the cardiac dimensions of 15 male competitive distance runners (28.2 ± 5.6 yr of age, mean ± SD) before and after 10 days of exercise cessation. Subjects were habitually active but adjusted their training to run 16 km daily for 2 wk before the study. Subjects were maintained on defined diets for the week before and during the detraining period. Average body weight decreased 1.0 ± 0.5 kg (P < 0.001) within 2 days of exercise cessation and was accompanied by a 5.0 ± 5.9% {P < 0.01) decrease in estimated plasma volume. No additional changes in body weight and plasma volume occurred during the study, and estimated percent body fat did not change. Resting heart rate, blood pressure, and cardiac dimensions were also unchanged with physical inactivity. In addition, maximum oxygen uptake was not altered although peak exercise heart rate was an average of 9 ± 5 beats - min-1 (P < 0.01) or 5% higher after detraining. We conclude that short periods of exercise cessation decrease estimated plasma volume and increase the maximum exercise heart rate of endurance athletes but do not alter their cardiac dimensions or maximum oxygen uptake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)420-424
Number of pages5
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume18
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cardiac dimensions
  • Detraining
  • Maximum oxygen uptake
  • Runners

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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    Cullinane, E. M., Sady, S. P., Vadeboncoeur, L., Burke, M., & Thompson, P. D. (1986). Cardiac size and VO2maxdo not decrease after short-term exercise cessation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 18(4), 420-424.