Canine Prostate Disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

All intact, male dogs will experience benign prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, usually by around 6 years old. Although these dogs will be predisposed to prostatic infections, only a small subset will actually develop infections or show clinical signs of discomfort or subfertility. Neutered male dogs have a higher incidence of neoplasia associated with the prostate. Updated diagnostic tests, including canine prostate-specific arginine esterase, are discussed. Castration is compared with medical treatment options. Updated treatment recommendations include reducing antibiotic exposure to 4 weeks for bacterial infections and use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs for neoplastic disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-719
Number of pages19
JournalVeterinary Clinics of North America - Small Animal Practice
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dog Diseases
Prostate
Prostatic Hyperplasia
Dogs
dogs
Castration
Infection
Bacterial Infections
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Infertility
Canidae
medical treatment
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
castration
bacterial infections
hypertrophy
hyperplasia
esterases
infection

Keywords

  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)
  • Canine prostate-specific arginine esterase (CPSE)
  • Prostate
  • Prostatic neoplasia
  • Prostatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

Cite this

Canine Prostate Disease. / Christensen, Bruce W.

In: Veterinary Clinics of North America - Small Animal Practice, Vol. 48, No. 4, 01.07.2018, p. 701-719.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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