Canine cranial cruciate ligament deficient stifle biomechanics associated with extra-articular stabilization predicted using a computer model

Nathan P. Brown, Gina E. Bertocci, Denis J Marcellin-Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate lateral fabellotibial suture (LFTS) and TightRope CCL (TR) extra-articular stabilization biomechanics in the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint during the stance phase of gait. Study design: Computer simulations. Animals: Healthy 33-kg Golden Retriever. Methods: LFTS and TR were implemented in a previously developed 3-D quasi-static rigid body CrCL-deficient canine pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation were determined and compared across the CrCL-intact, CrCL-deficient, and extra-articular stabilized stifle joints. Results: Compared to the CrCL-intact stifle, peak caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) loads were increased in the LFTS-managed stifle, peak caudal cruciate and LCL loads were decreased in the TR-managed stifle, and peak medial collateral and patellar ligament (PL) loads were similar for both techniques. Compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle, peak caudal cruciate, lateral collateral, and medial collateral ligament loads decreased, and peak PL load was similar in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints. Peak relative tibial translation decreased, and peak relative tibial rotation changed from internal rotation to external rotation in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. Conclusion: Our computer model predicted controlled tibial translation, decreased cruciate and collateral ligament loads, and a change in femorotibial rotation from internal to external with LFTS and TR stifle management as compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. This study demonstrates how computer modeling can be used to evaluate biomechanics of stifle stabilization surgical techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-662
Number of pages10
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Stifle
cranial cruciate ligament
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Biomechanical Phenomena
computer simulation
Computer Simulation
Canidae
Joints
ligaments
dogs
sutures
Sutures
joints (animal)
Collateral Ligaments
Ankle Lateral Ligament
Patellar Ligament
gait
Gait
biomechanics
Golden Retriever

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Canine cranial cruciate ligament deficient stifle biomechanics associated with extra-articular stabilization predicted using a computer model. / Brown, Nathan P.; Bertocci, Gina E.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 46, No. 5, 01.07.2017, p. 653-662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate lateral fabellotibial suture (LFTS) and TightRope CCL (TR) extra-articular stabilization biomechanics in the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint during the stance phase of gait. Study design: Computer simulations. Animals: Healthy 33-kg Golden Retriever. Methods: LFTS and TR were implemented in a previously developed 3-D quasi-static rigid body CrCL-deficient canine pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation were determined and compared across the CrCL-intact, CrCL-deficient, and extra-articular stabilized stifle joints. Results: Compared to the CrCL-intact stifle, peak caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) loads were increased in the LFTS-managed stifle, peak caudal cruciate and LCL loads were decreased in the TR-managed stifle, and peak medial collateral and patellar ligament (PL) loads were similar for both techniques. Compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle, peak caudal cruciate, lateral collateral, and medial collateral ligament loads decreased, and peak PL load was similar in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints. Peak relative tibial translation decreased, and peak relative tibial rotation changed from internal rotation to external rotation in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. Conclusion: Our computer model predicted controlled tibial translation, decreased cruciate and collateral ligament loads, and a change in femorotibial rotation from internal to external with LFTS and TR stifle management as compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. This study demonstrates how computer modeling can be used to evaluate biomechanics of stifle stabilization surgical techniques.",
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N2 - Objective: To evaluate lateral fabellotibial suture (LFTS) and TightRope CCL (TR) extra-articular stabilization biomechanics in the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint during the stance phase of gait. Study design: Computer simulations. Animals: Healthy 33-kg Golden Retriever. Methods: LFTS and TR were implemented in a previously developed 3-D quasi-static rigid body CrCL-deficient canine pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation were determined and compared across the CrCL-intact, CrCL-deficient, and extra-articular stabilized stifle joints. Results: Compared to the CrCL-intact stifle, peak caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) loads were increased in the LFTS-managed stifle, peak caudal cruciate and LCL loads were decreased in the TR-managed stifle, and peak medial collateral and patellar ligament (PL) loads were similar for both techniques. Compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle, peak caudal cruciate, lateral collateral, and medial collateral ligament loads decreased, and peak PL load was similar in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints. Peak relative tibial translation decreased, and peak relative tibial rotation changed from internal rotation to external rotation in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. Conclusion: Our computer model predicted controlled tibial translation, decreased cruciate and collateral ligament loads, and a change in femorotibial rotation from internal to external with LFTS and TR stifle management as compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. This study demonstrates how computer modeling can be used to evaluate biomechanics of stifle stabilization surgical techniques.

AB - Objective: To evaluate lateral fabellotibial suture (LFTS) and TightRope CCL (TR) extra-articular stabilization biomechanics in the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint during the stance phase of gait. Study design: Computer simulations. Animals: Healthy 33-kg Golden Retriever. Methods: LFTS and TR were implemented in a previously developed 3-D quasi-static rigid body CrCL-deficient canine pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation were determined and compared across the CrCL-intact, CrCL-deficient, and extra-articular stabilized stifle joints. Results: Compared to the CrCL-intact stifle, peak caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) loads were increased in the LFTS-managed stifle, peak caudal cruciate and LCL loads were decreased in the TR-managed stifle, and peak medial collateral and patellar ligament (PL) loads were similar for both techniques. Compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle, peak caudal cruciate, lateral collateral, and medial collateral ligament loads decreased, and peak PL load was similar in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints. Peak relative tibial translation decreased, and peak relative tibial rotation changed from internal rotation to external rotation in the LFTS- and TR-managed stifle joints compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. Conclusion: Our computer model predicted controlled tibial translation, decreased cruciate and collateral ligament loads, and a change in femorotibial rotation from internal to external with LFTS and TR stifle management as compared to the CrCL-deficient stifle. This study demonstrates how computer modeling can be used to evaluate biomechanics of stifle stabilization surgical techniques.

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