'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', a newly described pathogen of abalone, Haliotis spp., along the west coast of North America

Carolyn S. Friedman, Karl B. Andree, K. A. Beauchamp, James D. Moore, Thea T. Robbins, Jeffrey D. Shields, Ronald Hedrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Withering syndrome is a fatal disease of wild and cultured abalone, Haliotis spp., that inhabit the west coast of North America. The aetiological agent of withering syndrome has recently been identified as a member of the family Rickettsiaceae in the order Rickettsiales. Using a combination of morphological, serological, life history and genomic (16S rDNA) characterization, we have identified this bacterium as a unique taxon and propose the provisional status of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'. The Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pleomorphic bacterium is found within membrane-bound vacuoles in the cytoplasm of abalone gastrointestinal epithelial cells. The bacterium is not cultivable on synthetic media or in fish cell lines (e.g. CHSE-214) and may be controlled by tetracyclines (oxytetracycline) but not by chloramphenicol, clarithromycin or sarafloxicin. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' places it in the α-subclass of the class Proteobacteria but not to the four recognized subtaxa of the α-Proteobacteria (α-1, α-2, α-3 and α-4). The bacterium can be detected in tissue squashes stained with propidium iodide, microscopic examination of stained tissue sections, PCR or in situ hybridization. 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' can be differentiated from other closely related α-Proteobacteria by its unique 16S rDNA sequence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)847-855
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Haliotis
abalone
North America
Proteobacteria
pathogen
Ribosomal DNA
Bacteria
coasts
bacterium
pathogens
coast
bacteria
Rickettsiaceae
clarithromycin
Rickettsiales
Cucurbita
Tetracyclines
tetracyclines
Oxytetracycline
oxytetracycline

Keywords

  • 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'
  • Abalone
  • Haliotis
  • New taxon
  • Pathogen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', a newly described pathogen of abalone, Haliotis spp., along the west coast of North America. / Friedman, Carolyn S.; Andree, Karl B.; Beauchamp, K. A.; Moore, James D.; Robbins, Thea T.; Shields, Jeffrey D.; Hedrick, Ronald.

In: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, Vol. 50, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 847-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Friedman, Carolyn S. ; Andree, Karl B. ; Beauchamp, K. A. ; Moore, James D. ; Robbins, Thea T. ; Shields, Jeffrey D. ; Hedrick, Ronald. / 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', a newly described pathogen of abalone, Haliotis spp., along the west coast of North America. In: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 2000 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 847-855.
@article{11f2d30dcf994ad6932a735484ae556a,
title = "'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', a newly described pathogen of abalone, Haliotis spp., along the west coast of North America",
abstract = "Withering syndrome is a fatal disease of wild and cultured abalone, Haliotis spp., that inhabit the west coast of North America. The aetiological agent of withering syndrome has recently been identified as a member of the family Rickettsiaceae in the order Rickettsiales. Using a combination of morphological, serological, life history and genomic (16S rDNA) characterization, we have identified this bacterium as a unique taxon and propose the provisional status of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'. The Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pleomorphic bacterium is found within membrane-bound vacuoles in the cytoplasm of abalone gastrointestinal epithelial cells. The bacterium is not cultivable on synthetic media or in fish cell lines (e.g. CHSE-214) and may be controlled by tetracyclines (oxytetracycline) but not by chloramphenicol, clarithromycin or sarafloxicin. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' places it in the α-subclass of the class Proteobacteria but not to the four recognized subtaxa of the α-Proteobacteria (α-1, α-2, α-3 and α-4). The bacterium can be detected in tissue squashes stained with propidium iodide, microscopic examination of stained tissue sections, PCR or in situ hybridization. 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' can be differentiated from other closely related α-Proteobacteria by its unique 16S rDNA sequence.",
keywords = "'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', Abalone, Haliotis, New taxon, Pathogen",
author = "Friedman, {Carolyn S.} and Andree, {Karl B.} and Beauchamp, {K. A.} and Moore, {James D.} and Robbins, {Thea T.} and Shields, {Jeffrey D.} and Ronald Hedrick",
year = "2000",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1099/00207713-50-2-847",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "847--855",
journal = "International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology",
issn = "1466-5026",
publisher = "Society for General Microbiology",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis', a newly described pathogen of abalone, Haliotis spp., along the west coast of North America

AU - Friedman, Carolyn S.

AU - Andree, Karl B.

AU - Beauchamp, K. A.

AU - Moore, James D.

AU - Robbins, Thea T.

AU - Shields, Jeffrey D.

AU - Hedrick, Ronald

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - Withering syndrome is a fatal disease of wild and cultured abalone, Haliotis spp., that inhabit the west coast of North America. The aetiological agent of withering syndrome has recently been identified as a member of the family Rickettsiaceae in the order Rickettsiales. Using a combination of morphological, serological, life history and genomic (16S rDNA) characterization, we have identified this bacterium as a unique taxon and propose the provisional status of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'. The Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pleomorphic bacterium is found within membrane-bound vacuoles in the cytoplasm of abalone gastrointestinal epithelial cells. The bacterium is not cultivable on synthetic media or in fish cell lines (e.g. CHSE-214) and may be controlled by tetracyclines (oxytetracycline) but not by chloramphenicol, clarithromycin or sarafloxicin. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' places it in the α-subclass of the class Proteobacteria but not to the four recognized subtaxa of the α-Proteobacteria (α-1, α-2, α-3 and α-4). The bacterium can be detected in tissue squashes stained with propidium iodide, microscopic examination of stained tissue sections, PCR or in situ hybridization. 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' can be differentiated from other closely related α-Proteobacteria by its unique 16S rDNA sequence.

AB - Withering syndrome is a fatal disease of wild and cultured abalone, Haliotis spp., that inhabit the west coast of North America. The aetiological agent of withering syndrome has recently been identified as a member of the family Rickettsiaceae in the order Rickettsiales. Using a combination of morphological, serological, life history and genomic (16S rDNA) characterization, we have identified this bacterium as a unique taxon and propose the provisional status of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'. The Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pleomorphic bacterium is found within membrane-bound vacuoles in the cytoplasm of abalone gastrointestinal epithelial cells. The bacterium is not cultivable on synthetic media or in fish cell lines (e.g. CHSE-214) and may be controlled by tetracyclines (oxytetracycline) but not by chloramphenicol, clarithromycin or sarafloxicin. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA of 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' places it in the α-subclass of the class Proteobacteria but not to the four recognized subtaxa of the α-Proteobacteria (α-1, α-2, α-3 and α-4). The bacterium can be detected in tissue squashes stained with propidium iodide, microscopic examination of stained tissue sections, PCR or in situ hybridization. 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis' can be differentiated from other closely related α-Proteobacteria by its unique 16S rDNA sequence.

KW - 'Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis'

KW - Abalone

KW - Haliotis

KW - New taxon

KW - Pathogen

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034101044&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034101044&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1099/00207713-50-2-847

DO - 10.1099/00207713-50-2-847

M3 - Article

C2 - 10758896

AN - SCOPUS:0034101044

VL - 50

SP - 847

EP - 855

JO - International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology

JF - International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology

SN - 1466-5026

IS - 2

ER -