Cancer screening among women prescribed opioids: A national study

Alicia Agnoli, Anthony Jerant, Peter Franks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE Prior work suggests that there are competing demands between addressing pain and other issues in primary care, potentially lessening delivery of evidence-based cancer screening. We assessed the association between opioid therapy and cancer screening among women in a nationally representative US sample. METHODS We conducted an observational analysis of the 2005-2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. We included all women aged ≥18 years without cancer and with opioid prescription and preventive care services data. Logistic regression analyses examined associations between receipt of opioid prescription (any vs none) and receipt of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health conditions, and usual source of care, as well as health care utilization. RESULTS Of 53,982 participants, 15.8% reported ≥1 opioid prescription. Compared with women not prescribed opioids, those prescribed opioids were more likely to visit their doctor (median number of visits per year = 5, vs 1). Without adjustment for number of visits, women prescribed opioids were more likely to receive all 3 cancer screenings; the adjusted odds ratio for breast cancer screening was 1.26 (95% CI, 1.16-1.38), that for cervical cancer screening was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.13-1.33), and that for colorectal cancer screening was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.12-1.33). With adjustment for number of visits, adjusted odds ratios decreased (breast 1.07 [95% CI, 0.98-1.18]; cervical 1.01 [95% CI, 0.93-1.09]; colorectal 1.04 [95% CI, 0.95-1.14]). CONCLUSIONS In a nationally representative sample, receipt of opioid prescriptions was not associated with less recommended cancer screenings. Rather, women receiving opioids had greater adjusted odds of receiving breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening, although the associations were attenuated by adjusting for their more frequent office visits relative to women not receiving opioids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-65
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Family Medicine
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

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Early Detection of Cancer
Opioid Analgesics
Prescriptions
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Colorectal Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Office Visits
Preventive Medicine
Health Expenditures
Health Status
Primary Health Care
Breast
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Pain
Health

Keywords

  • Cancer screening
  • Opioids
  • Women’s health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Cancer screening among women prescribed opioids : A national study. / Agnoli, Alicia; Jerant, Anthony; Franks, Peter.

In: Annals of Family Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 59-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - PURPOSE Prior work suggests that there are competing demands between addressing pain and other issues in primary care, potentially lessening delivery of evidence-based cancer screening. We assessed the association between opioid therapy and cancer screening among women in a nationally representative US sample. METHODS We conducted an observational analysis of the 2005-2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. We included all women aged ≥18 years without cancer and with opioid prescription and preventive care services data. Logistic regression analyses examined associations between receipt of opioid prescription (any vs none) and receipt of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health conditions, and usual source of care, as well as health care utilization. RESULTS Of 53,982 participants, 15.8% reported ≥1 opioid prescription. Compared with women not prescribed opioids, those prescribed opioids were more likely to visit their doctor (median number of visits per year = 5, vs 1). Without adjustment for number of visits, women prescribed opioids were more likely to receive all 3 cancer screenings; the adjusted odds ratio for breast cancer screening was 1.26 (95% CI, 1.16-1.38), that for cervical cancer screening was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.13-1.33), and that for colorectal cancer screening was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.12-1.33). With adjustment for number of visits, adjusted odds ratios decreased (breast 1.07 [95% CI, 0.98-1.18]; cervical 1.01 [95% CI, 0.93-1.09]; colorectal 1.04 [95% CI, 0.95-1.14]). CONCLUSIONS In a nationally representative sample, receipt of opioid prescriptions was not associated with less recommended cancer screenings. Rather, women receiving opioids had greater adjusted odds of receiving breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening, although the associations were attenuated by adjusting for their more frequent office visits relative to women not receiving opioids.

AB - PURPOSE Prior work suggests that there are competing demands between addressing pain and other issues in primary care, potentially lessening delivery of evidence-based cancer screening. We assessed the association between opioid therapy and cancer screening among women in a nationally representative US sample. METHODS We conducted an observational analysis of the 2005-2015 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys. We included all women aged ≥18 years without cancer and with opioid prescription and preventive care services data. Logistic regression analyses examined associations between receipt of opioid prescription (any vs none) and receipt of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health conditions, and usual source of care, as well as health care utilization. RESULTS Of 53,982 participants, 15.8% reported ≥1 opioid prescription. Compared with women not prescribed opioids, those prescribed opioids were more likely to visit their doctor (median number of visits per year = 5, vs 1). Without adjustment for number of visits, women prescribed opioids were more likely to receive all 3 cancer screenings; the adjusted odds ratio for breast cancer screening was 1.26 (95% CI, 1.16-1.38), that for cervical cancer screening was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.13-1.33), and that for colorectal cancer screening was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.12-1.33). With adjustment for number of visits, adjusted odds ratios decreased (breast 1.07 [95% CI, 0.98-1.18]; cervical 1.01 [95% CI, 0.93-1.09]; colorectal 1.04 [95% CI, 0.95-1.14]). CONCLUSIONS In a nationally representative sample, receipt of opioid prescriptions was not associated with less recommended cancer screenings. Rather, women receiving opioids had greater adjusted odds of receiving breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening, although the associations were attenuated by adjusting for their more frequent office visits relative to women not receiving opioids.

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