Can external fixation maintain reduction after distal radius fractures?

Paul Dicpinigaitis, Philip R Wolinsky, Rudi Hiebert, Kenneth Egol, Kenneth Koval, Nirmal Tejwani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of external fixation and percutaneous pinning in maintaining distal radius fracture reduction over a 6-month period and to identify factors that might predict loss of fracture reduction. Methods: Seventy cases had complete radiographic evaluation before surgery; at surgery; and at 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up. Radiographic parameters measured included volar tilt, dorsal displacement, radial inclination, radial height, radial shift, and ulnar variance. Results: Dorsal tilt averaged 17.5 degrees from neutral before surgery; this value was corrected to 0.9 degree at surgery, but then progressed to 4.2 degrees by the 6-month follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, 49% of cases had lost more than 5 degrees of initially reduced volar tilt. However, none of these patients went from an acceptable initial reduction to an unacceptable reduction at 6 months. Initial deformity, patient age, use of bone graft, and duration of external fixation were not predictors of loss of reduction. Conclusion: Loss of reduction of volar tilt was seen for a period of up to 6 months after fixation, despite the use of pinning to hold the reduction. No specific predictor of loss of reduction was noted, although there was a trend toward loss of reduction in younger patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-850
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Radius Fractures
Fracture Fixation
Transplants
Bone and Bones

Keywords

  • Anatomic Fracture Reduction
  • Augmented external fixation with Kirschner wires
  • Distal radius fracture
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Can external fixation maintain reduction after distal radius fractures? / Dicpinigaitis, Paul; Wolinsky, Philip R; Hiebert, Rudi; Egol, Kenneth; Koval, Kenneth; Tejwani, Nirmal.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 57, No. 4, 10.2004, p. 845-850.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dicpinigaitis, Paul ; Wolinsky, Philip R ; Hiebert, Rudi ; Egol, Kenneth ; Koval, Kenneth ; Tejwani, Nirmal. / Can external fixation maintain reduction after distal radius fractures?. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 2004 ; Vol. 57, No. 4. pp. 845-850.
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