Can dietary intake patterns account for the familial aggregation of disease? Evidence from adult siblings living apart

T. A. Sellers, L. H. Kushi, J. D. Potter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The familial aggregation of certain chronic diseases is well documented [Perkins, 1986; King et al., 1984; Anderson, 1982]. Dietary data on adult brothers living apart were used to examine whether familial clustering of disease could be explained by nature or nutriture. Intakes of nutrients were strikingly more similar among siblings than expected: when correlations were adjusted for country of residence, 21 of 25 (84%) were statistically significant. Thus, dietary patterns among adult siblings are more alike than could be predicted by their sharing a common culture, as alike as has been described for monozygotic twins, and as alike as described for familial correlations of serum cholesterol. Incorporation of dietary measures in co-twin studies or studies of siblings can improve the estimates of the true genetic effect on disease pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-112
Number of pages8
JournalGenetic Epidemiology
Volume8
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Epidemiology

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