Callosal involvement in a lateralized stroop task in alcoholic and healthy subjects

T. Schulte, E. M. Müller-Oehring, R. Salo, A. Pfefferbaum, E. V. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the role of interhemispheric attentional processes, 25 alcoholic and 28 control subjects were tested with a Stroop match-to-sample task and callosal areas were measured with magnetic resonance imaging. Stroop color-word stimuli were presented to the left or right visual field (VF) and were preceded by a color cue that did or did not match the word's color. For matching colors, both groups showed a right VF advantage; for nonmatching colors, controls showed a left VF advantage, whereas alcoholic subjects showed no VF advantage. For nonmatch trials, VF advantage correlated with callosal splenium area in controls but not alcoholic subjects, supporting the position that information presented to the nonpreferred hemisphere is transmitted via the splenium to the hemisphere specialized for efficient processing. The authors speculate that alcoholism-associated callosal thinning disrupts this processing route.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)727-736
Number of pages10
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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Corpus Callosum
Visual Fields
Healthy Volunteers
Color
Alcoholics
Alcoholism
Cues
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • Corpus callosum
  • Interhemispheric attentional processes
  • Lateralization
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Stroop task

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Schulte, T., Müller-Oehring, E. M., Salo, R., Pfefferbaum, A., & Sullivan, E. V. (2006). Callosal involvement in a lateralized stroop task in alcoholic and healthy subjects. Neuropsychology, 20(6), 727-736. https://doi.org/10.1037/0894-4105.20.6.727

Callosal involvement in a lateralized stroop task in alcoholic and healthy subjects. / Schulte, T.; Müller-Oehring, E. M.; Salo, R.; Pfefferbaum, A.; Sullivan, E. V.

In: Neuropsychology, Vol. 20, No. 6, 11.2006, p. 727-736.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schulte, T, Müller-Oehring, EM, Salo, R, Pfefferbaum, A & Sullivan, EV 2006, 'Callosal involvement in a lateralized stroop task in alcoholic and healthy subjects', Neuropsychology, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 727-736. https://doi.org/10.1037/0894-4105.20.6.727
Schulte T, Müller-Oehring EM, Salo R, Pfefferbaum A, Sullivan EV. Callosal involvement in a lateralized stroop task in alcoholic and healthy subjects. Neuropsychology. 2006 Nov;20(6):727-736. https://doi.org/10.1037/0894-4105.20.6.727
Schulte, T. ; Müller-Oehring, E. M. ; Salo, R. ; Pfefferbaum, A. ; Sullivan, E. V. / Callosal involvement in a lateralized stroop task in alcoholic and healthy subjects. In: Neuropsychology. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 727-736.
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