C-reactive protein as an indicator of inflammatory responses to experimentally induced cystitis in dogs

Kyoung Won Seo, Jong Bok Lee, Jin Ok Ahn, Hee Woo Lee, Cheol Yong Hwang, Hwa Young Youn, Chang Woo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to demonstrate and assess C-reactive protein (CRP) changes in dogs with induced bacterial cystitis with or without antibiotics. We also evaluated availability of CRP levels to serve as an indicator for monitoring or diagnosing bacterial cystitis. Serial CRP concentrations in dogs with induced bacterial cystitis were higher than those of controls (p < 0.001). CRP concentrations peaked on day 7 and gradually decreased thereafter. In the treatment group, CRP concentrations decreased after medication compared to the untreated group (p = 0.032). CRP levels had a linear correlation with urine white blood cell counts among all groups (r = 0.837, p < 0.001, n = 140). Compared to the negative urine culture group, dogs with positive urine culture results had higher CRP concentrations (median 43.8 mg/L vs. 5.9 mg/L; p < 0.001). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.955; when cut-off value was 12.2 mg/L, CRP measurements were found to have a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 86.4%. This result indicates that rapid increases of CRP occurred after inducing bacterial cystitis and CRP may be a useful indicator for monitoring or diagnosing canine bacterial cystitis together with sediment urinalysis and urine bacterial culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-185
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Veterinary Science
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bacterial cystitis
  • C-reactive protein
  • Dog
  • Proteus mirabilis
  • Urine WBC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'C-reactive protein as an indicator of inflammatory responses to experimentally induced cystitis in dogs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this