Building Research Capacity With Members of Underserved American Indian/Alaskan Native Communities

Training in Research Ethics and the Protection of Human Subjects

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To develop a research ethics training course for American Indian/Alaskan Native health clinic staff and community researchers who would be conducting human subjects research. Method. Community-based participatory research methods were used in facilitated discussions of research ethics centered around topics included in the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative research ethics course. Results. The community-based participatory research approach allowed all partners to jointly develop a research ethics training program that was relevant for American Indian/Alaskan Native communities. All community and clinic partners were able to pass the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative course they were required to pass so that they could be certified to conduct research with human subjects on federally funded projects. In addition, the training sessions provided a foundation for increased community oversight of research. Conclusions. By using a collaborative process to engage community partners in research ethics discussions, rather than either an asynchronous online or a lecture/presentation format, resulted in significant mutual learning about research ethics and community concerns about research. This approach requires university researchers to invest time in learning about the communities in which they will be working prior to the training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-425
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2015

Fingerprint

Research Ethics
Capacity Building
North American Indians
Population Groups
Research
Community-Based Participatory Research
Research Personnel
Learning
Education
Health

Keywords

  • community-based participatory research
  • ethics
  • health research
  • training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{7d5b27ac60474a12b0bc100201dbb30e,
title = "Building Research Capacity With Members of Underserved American Indian/Alaskan Native Communities: Training in Research Ethics and the Protection of Human Subjects",
abstract = "Objective. To develop a research ethics training course for American Indian/Alaskan Native health clinic staff and community researchers who would be conducting human subjects research. Method. Community-based participatory research methods were used in facilitated discussions of research ethics centered around topics included in the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative research ethics course. Results. The community-based participatory research approach allowed all partners to jointly develop a research ethics training program that was relevant for American Indian/Alaskan Native communities. All community and clinic partners were able to pass the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative course they were required to pass so that they could be certified to conduct research with human subjects on federally funded projects. In addition, the training sessions provided a foundation for increased community oversight of research. Conclusions. By using a collaborative process to engage community partners in research ethics discussions, rather than either an asynchronous online or a lecture/presentation format, resulted in significant mutual learning about research ethics and community concerns about research. This approach requires university researchers to invest time in learning about the communities in which they will be working prior to the training.",
keywords = "community-based participatory research, ethics, health research, training",
author = "Jetter, {Karen M.} and Yarborough, {Mark A} and Cassady, {Diana L} and Styne, {Dennis M}",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1177/1524839914548450",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "419--425",
journal = "Health Promotion Practice",
issn = "1524-8399",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Building Research Capacity With Members of Underserved American Indian/Alaskan Native Communities

T2 - Training in Research Ethics and the Protection of Human Subjects

AU - Jetter, Karen M.

AU - Yarborough, Mark A

AU - Cassady, Diana L

AU - Styne, Dennis M

PY - 2015/5/9

Y1 - 2015/5/9

N2 - Objective. To develop a research ethics training course for American Indian/Alaskan Native health clinic staff and community researchers who would be conducting human subjects research. Method. Community-based participatory research methods were used in facilitated discussions of research ethics centered around topics included in the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative research ethics course. Results. The community-based participatory research approach allowed all partners to jointly develop a research ethics training program that was relevant for American Indian/Alaskan Native communities. All community and clinic partners were able to pass the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative course they were required to pass so that they could be certified to conduct research with human subjects on federally funded projects. In addition, the training sessions provided a foundation for increased community oversight of research. Conclusions. By using a collaborative process to engage community partners in research ethics discussions, rather than either an asynchronous online or a lecture/presentation format, resulted in significant mutual learning about research ethics and community concerns about research. This approach requires university researchers to invest time in learning about the communities in which they will be working prior to the training.

AB - Objective. To develop a research ethics training course for American Indian/Alaskan Native health clinic staff and community researchers who would be conducting human subjects research. Method. Community-based participatory research methods were used in facilitated discussions of research ethics centered around topics included in the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative research ethics course. Results. The community-based participatory research approach allowed all partners to jointly develop a research ethics training program that was relevant for American Indian/Alaskan Native communities. All community and clinic partners were able to pass the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative course they were required to pass so that they could be certified to conduct research with human subjects on federally funded projects. In addition, the training sessions provided a foundation for increased community oversight of research. Conclusions. By using a collaborative process to engage community partners in research ethics discussions, rather than either an asynchronous online or a lecture/presentation format, resulted in significant mutual learning about research ethics and community concerns about research. This approach requires university researchers to invest time in learning about the communities in which they will be working prior to the training.

KW - community-based participatory research

KW - ethics

KW - health research

KW - training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930592595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84930592595&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1524839914548450

DO - 10.1177/1524839914548450

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 419

EP - 425

JO - Health Promotion Practice

JF - Health Promotion Practice

SN - 1524-8399

IS - 3

ER -