Budding yeast centrosome duplication requires stabilization of Spc29 via Mps1-mediated phosphorylation

Eric P. Holinger, William M. Old, Thomas H. Giddings, Catherine Wong, John R. Yates, Mark Winey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of centrosome duplication. In budding yeast, numerous lines of evidence suggest a requirement for multiple phosphorylation events on individual components of the centrosome to ensure their proper assembly and function. Here, we report the first example of a single phosphorylation event on a component of the yeast centrosome, or spindle pole body (SPB), that is required for SPB duplication and cell viability. This phosphorylation event is on the essential SPB component Spc29 at a conserved Thr residue, Thr240. Mutation of Thr240 to Ala is lethal at normal gene dosage, but an increased copy number of this mutant allele results in a conditional phenotype. Phosphorylation of Thr240 was found to promote the stability of the protein in vivo and is catalyzed in vitro by the Mps1 kinase. Furthermore, the stability of newly synthesized Spc29 is reduced in a mutant strain with reduced Mps1 kinase activity. These results demonstrate the first evidence for a single phosphorylation event on an SPB component that is absolutely required for SPB duplication and suggest that the Mps1 kinase is responsible for this protein-stabilizing phosphorylation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12949-12955
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume284
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Centrosome
Phosphorylation
Saccharomycetales
Spindle Pole Bodies
Yeast
Stabilization
Poles
Phosphotransferases
Proteins
Gene Dosage
Protein Stability
Cell Survival
Genes
Yeasts
Alleles
Cells
Phenotype
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Budding yeast centrosome duplication requires stabilization of Spc29 via Mps1-mediated phosphorylation. / Holinger, Eric P.; Old, William M.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Wong, Catherine; Yates, John R.; Winey, Mark.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 284, No. 19, 08.05.2009, p. 12949-12955.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Holinger, Eric P. ; Old, William M. ; Giddings, Thomas H. ; Wong, Catherine ; Yates, John R. ; Winey, Mark. / Budding yeast centrosome duplication requires stabilization of Spc29 via Mps1-mediated phosphorylation. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2009 ; Vol. 284, No. 19. pp. 12949-12955.
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