Brugia malayi and Brugia pahangi: inherent difference in immune activation in the mosquitoes Armigeres subalbatus and Aedes aegypti

B. T. Beerntsen, S. Luckhart, B. M. Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

The inherent ability of Brugia malayi and Brugia pahangi (Nematoda) to establish successful relationships with the mosquitoes Armigeres subalbatus and Aedes aegypti Liverpool strain was evaluated. Brugia pahangi microfilariae (mff) avoided the immune response and developed normally in A. subalbatus exposed to the parasite by an infective bloodmeal, whereas nearly 85% of B. malayi were destroyed by the immune response. Because A. aegypti supports the development of both filarial worm species but destroys intrathoracically inoculated B. pahangi isolated from jird blood, blood-isolated B. malayi were inoculated into A. aegypti, and the immune response was compared with that observed against B. pahangi. The response against B. malayi was significantly more rapid and effective than the response against B. pahangi. Similar results were obtained when blood-isolated B. pahangi or B. malayi were inoculated into A. subalbatus. Microfilariae of both species were able to avoid immune destruction in A. aegypti if they were allowed to penetrate the Liverpool midgut in vitro prior to inoculation. Most B. pahangi that had first penetrated an Armigeres midgut prior to inoculation into A. subalbatus were able to avoid the immune response, but by day 3 postinoculation, less than 40% of the B. malayi, treated in the same manner, were able to escape the immune response. Genetic susceptibility of mosquitoes to infection by filarial worms and potential mechanisms of immune evasion/suppression are discussed regarding B. malayi and B. pahangi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-81
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Parasitology
Volume75
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Microbiology
  • Parasitology

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