Bright Light as a Preventive Intervention for Depression in Late-Life: A Pilot Study on Feasibility, Acceptability, and Symptom Improvement

Amanda N. Leggett, Deirdre A. Conroy, Frederic C. Blow, Helen C. Kales

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We examined the feasibility and acceptability of a portable bright light intervention and its impact on sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods: One-arm prevention intervention pilot study of the Re-Timer (Re-Timer Pty Ltd, Adelaide, Australia) bright light device (worn 30 minutes daily for 2 weeks) in 1 older adults (age 65 + years) with subsyndromal symptoms of depression and poor sleep quality. Participants were assessed on intervention acceptability and adherence, depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire- 9), and sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, actigraphy and daily diary reports). Results: The Re-Timer device was rated positively by participants, and, on average, participants only missed 1 day of utilization. Although depressive symptoms declined and self-reported sleep improved, improvement was seen largely before the start of intervention. Conclusions: An effective preventive intervention that is targeted towards a high risk group of older adults has the potential to reduce distress and costly health service use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)598-602
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep
Depression
Light
Actigraphy
Equipment and Supplies
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Health Services
Health

Keywords

  • depressive symptoms
  • intervention
  • light therapy
  • prevention
  • Sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Bright Light as a Preventive Intervention for Depression in Late-Life : A Pilot Study on Feasibility, Acceptability, and Symptom Improvement. / Leggett, Amanda N.; Conroy, Deirdre A.; Blow, Frederic C.; Kales, Helen C.

In: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 5, 05.2018, p. 598-602.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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