Brief Report: Parent–Adolescent Informant Discrepancies of Social Skill Importance and Social Skill Engagement for Higher-Functioning Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Camilla M. McMahon, Marjorie Solomon Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Parent- and adolescent-report of social skill importance and social skill engagement on the Social Skills Rating System (Gresham and Elliott in The social skills rating system, American Guidance Service, Circle Pines, 1990) were assessed in higher-functioning adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Compared to parents, adolescents reported that social skills were less important. Additionally, adolescents reported that they engaged in social skills more frequently than parents reported them to be engaging in social skills. Parents, but not adolescents, reported a discrepancy between importance and engagement, such that the importance of social skills was rated higher than the frequency of adolescent engagement in social skills. These results suggest that social skills interventions for individuals with ASD may need to target awareness of social skill importance and accurate monitoring of social skill engagement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3396-3403
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume45
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2015

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Awareness
  • Informant discrepancy
  • Social skill engagement
  • Social skill importance
  • Social Skills Rating System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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