Breast-fed infants are leaner than formula-fed infants at 1 y of age: The DARLING study

Kathryn G. Dewey, M. Jane Heinig, Laurie A. Nommsen, Janet M. Peerson, Bo Lönnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

196 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anthropometric indexes from 1 to 24 mo were compared between matched cohorts of infants either breast-fed (BF, n = 46) or formula-fed (FF, n = 41) until ≥ 12 mo. Neither group received solid foods before 4 mo. Weight-for-length was significantly greater among FF infants from 7 to 24 mo. In both groups, skinfold thickness (triceps, biceps, subscapular, flank, and quadriceps) and estimated percent body fat (%FAT) increased rapidly during the first 6-8 mo and declined thereafter. At all sites except biceps, FF infants had larger skinfold thicknesses in later infancy (particularly 9-15 mo) than did BF infants; %FAT was significantly higher from 5 to 24 mo. Lower energy intake among BF infants explained the difference between groups. Maternal and infant fatness were positively correlated at 12-24 mo. Breast-milk lipid and energy concentration were unrelated to infant fatness. These results indicate that infants BF for ≥ 12 mo are leaner than their FF counterparts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)140-145
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume57
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1993

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Infant Formula
skinfold thickness
infant formulas
breasts
Breast
feed formulation
infancy
breast milk
milk fat
body fat
energy intake
Skinfold Thickness
energy
Human Milk
Energy Intake
Adipose Tissue
Mothers
Lipids
Weights and Measures
Food

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Body composition
  • Fatness
  • Growth
  • Infant nutrition
  • Lactation
  • Obesity
  • Skinfold thickness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Dewey, K. G., Heinig, M. J., Nommsen, L. A., Peerson, J. M., & Lönnerdal, B. (1993). Breast-fed infants are leaner than formula-fed infants at 1 y of age: The DARLING study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 57(2), 140-145.

Breast-fed infants are leaner than formula-fed infants at 1 y of age : The DARLING study. / Dewey, Kathryn G.; Heinig, M. Jane; Nommsen, Laurie A.; Peerson, Janet M.; Lönnerdal, Bo.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 57, No. 2, 02.1993, p. 140-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dewey, KG, Heinig, MJ, Nommsen, LA, Peerson, JM & Lönnerdal, B 1993, 'Breast-fed infants are leaner than formula-fed infants at 1 y of age: The DARLING study', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 140-145.
Dewey KG, Heinig MJ, Nommsen LA, Peerson JM, Lönnerdal B. Breast-fed infants are leaner than formula-fed infants at 1 y of age: The DARLING study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1993 Feb;57(2):140-145.
Dewey, Kathryn G. ; Heinig, M. Jane ; Nommsen, Laurie A. ; Peerson, Janet M. ; Lönnerdal, Bo. / Breast-fed infants are leaner than formula-fed infants at 1 y of age : The DARLING study. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1993 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 140-145.
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