Breast and cervical cancer screening for women with mental illness: Patient and provider perspectives on improving linkages between primary care and mental health

E. Miller, K. E. Lasser, A. E. Becker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Previous research suggests that women with mental illness may be at increased risk for breast and cervical cancer. This qualitative study of patients and primary care and mental health providers explored challenges to accessing and providing breast and cervical cancer screening for women with mental illness. Method: Key informant patient and provider participants were recruited from a community health setting and teaching hospital. Narrative data from 1) interviews with women in a community primary care setting (n = 16); 2) telephone interviews with women with mental illness (n = 16); and 3) focus groups with primary care providers (n = 9) and mental health providers (n = 26) were collected. Results: Patient, provider, and system factors that may contribute to suboptimal cancer screening among women with mental illness were identified. Communication between primary care and mental health providers was noted as a key area for intervention to enhance screening. Barriers to and possibilities for a more proactive role for mental health providers were also considered. Conclusions: Both patient and provider study participants emphasized the need to address communication gaps between primary care and mental health providers and to promote the active collaboration of mental health providers in preventive cancer screening for women with mental illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-197
Number of pages9
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Fingerprint

Mentally Ill Persons
Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Primary Health Care
Mental Health
Breast Neoplasms
Communication
Interviews
Focus Groups
Teaching Hospitals
Patient Care
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer screening
  • Mammography
  • Mental health
  • Preventive care
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Breast and cervical cancer screening for women with mental illness : Patient and provider perspectives on improving linkages between primary care and mental health. / Miller, E.; Lasser, K. E.; Becker, A. E.

In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, Vol. 10, No. 5, 10.2007, p. 189-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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