Brain-muscle-computer interface using a single surface electromyographic signal

Initial results

Sanjay S. Joshi, Anthony S. Wexler, Claudia Perez-Maldonado, Scott Vernon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We review progress towards developing a new human-computer interface that uses only a single sEMG sensor to achieve complex control of external devices. The interface relies on an underlying neuromuscular result, in which we showed that the human neuromuscular system can simultaneously manipulate partial power in two separate frequency bands of a sEMG power spectrum at a single muscle site. Subjects are trained using visual feedback based operant conditioning. The two frequency bands can then be used as two separate control channels to achieve multidimensional control of external objects, using only a single measured sEMG signal. Our first results showed that subjects could hit targets on a computer screen in two-dimensions with a cursor. Cursor manipulation was then paired with a finite-state machine to achieve control of simulated and actual power wheelchairs. Work on brain-muscle-computer interfaces is still in its infancy, and fundamental questions must still be answered in terms of training, usability, and underlying neurophysiological mechanisms. However, our early results show promise that these interfaces may provide a new option to benefit the lives of severely paralyzed persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011
Pages342-347
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011 - Cancun, Mexico
Duration: Apr 27 2011May 1 2011

Other

Other2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011
CountryMexico
CityCancun
Period4/27/115/1/11

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Operant Conditioning
Muscles
Sensory Feedback
Wheelchairs
Equipment and Supplies
Power (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Joshi, S. S., Wexler, A. S., Perez-Maldonado, C., & Vernon, S. (2011). Brain-muscle-computer interface using a single surface electromyographic signal: Initial results. In 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011 (pp. 342-347). [5910557] https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2011.5910557

Brain-muscle-computer interface using a single surface electromyographic signal : Initial results. / Joshi, Sanjay S.; Wexler, Anthony S.; Perez-Maldonado, Claudia; Vernon, Scott.

2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011. 2011. p. 342-347 5910557.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Joshi, SS, Wexler, AS, Perez-Maldonado, C & Vernon, S 2011, Brain-muscle-computer interface using a single surface electromyographic signal: Initial results. in 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011., 5910557, pp. 342-347, 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011, Cancun, Mexico, 4/27/11. https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2011.5910557
Joshi SS, Wexler AS, Perez-Maldonado C, Vernon S. Brain-muscle-computer interface using a single surface electromyographic signal: Initial results. In 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011. 2011. p. 342-347. 5910557 https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2011.5910557
Joshi, Sanjay S. ; Wexler, Anthony S. ; Perez-Maldonado, Claudia ; Vernon, Scott. / Brain-muscle-computer interface using a single surface electromyographic signal : Initial results. 2011 5th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2011. 2011. pp. 342-347
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