Bovine herpesvirus-1: Evaluation of genetic diversity of subtypes derived from field strains of varied clinical syndromes and their relationship to vaccine strains

R. W. Fulton, J. M. d'Offay, R. Eberle, R. B. Moeller, H. Van Campen, D. O'Toole, C. Chase, M. M. Miller, R. Sprowls, D. V. Nydam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1) causes significant disease in cattle. Control programs in North America incorporate vaccination with modified live viral (MLV) or killed (KV) vaccine. BoHV-1 strains are isolated from diseased animals or fetuses after vaccination. There are markers for differentiating MLV from field strains using whole-genome sequencing and analysis identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Using multiple primer sets and sequencing of products permits association of BoHV-1 isolates with vaccines. To determine association between vaccine virus and strains isolated from clinical cases following vaccination, we analyzed 12 BoHV-1 isolates from animals with various clinical syndromes; 9 corresponded to BoHV-1.1 respiratory group. The remaining three corresponded to BoHV-1.2b, typically found in genital tracts of cattle. Four BoHV-1 isolates were identical to a vaccine strain; three were from post-vaccination abortion episodes with typical herpetic lesions whose dams had received MLV vaccine during pregnancy, and one from a heifer given a related MLV vaccine; Sequences of two respiratory isolates perfectly matched mutations characterizing RLB106 strain, a temperature sensitive mutant used in intranasal and parenteral vaccines. The last three respiratory strains clearly appeared related to a group of MLV vaccines. Previously the MLV vaccines were grouped into four groups based on SNPs patterns. In contrast with above-mentioned isolates that closely matched SNP patterns of their respective MLV vaccine virus, these 3 strains both lacked some and possessed a number of additional mutations compared to a group of MLV vaccine viral genome. Finding BoHV-1.2b in respiratory cases indicates focus should be given BoHV-1.2b as an emerging virus or a virus not recognized nor fully characterized in BRD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)549-558
Number of pages10
JournalVaccine
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2015

Keywords

  • Bovine herpesvirus-1
  • Clinical syndromes
  • Genetics
  • Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

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    Fulton, R. W., d'Offay, J. M., Eberle, R., Moeller, R. B., Campen, H. V., O'Toole, D., Chase, C., Miller, M. M., Sprowls, R., & Nydam, D. V. (2015). Bovine herpesvirus-1: Evaluation of genetic diversity of subtypes derived from field strains of varied clinical syndromes and their relationship to vaccine strains. Vaccine, 33(4), 549-558. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.11.033