Boiling and frying peanuts decreases soluble peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 but does not generate hypoallergenic peanuts

Sarah S. Comstock, Soheila J. Maleki, Suzanne S Teuber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Peanut allergy continues to be a problem in most developed countries of the world. We sought a processing method that would alter allergenic peanut proteins, such that allergen recognition by IgE from allergic individuals would be significantly reduced or eliminated. Such a method would render accidental exposures to trace amounts of peanuts safer. A combination of boiling and frying decreased recovery of Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 at their expected MWs. In contrast, treatment with high pressures under varying temperatures had no effect on protein extraction profiles. Antibodies specific for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 6 bound proteins extracted from raw samples but not in boiled/fried samples. However, preincubation of serum with boiled/fried extract removed most raw peanut-reactive IgE from solution, including IgE directed to Ara h 1 and 2. Thus, this method of processing is unlikely to generate a peanut product tolerated by peanut allergic patients. Importantly, variability in individual patients' IgE repertoires may mean that some patients' IgE would bind fewer polypeptides in the sequentially processed seed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0157849
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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frying
Arachis hypogaea
allergens
boiling
Boiling liquids
Immunoglobulin E
peanuts
peanut products
peanut protein
Peanut Hypersensitivity
Allergies
processing technology
Proteins
developed countries
hypersensitivity
polypeptides
Processing
Developed Countries
proteins
Allergens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Boiling and frying peanuts decreases soluble peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 but does not generate hypoallergenic peanuts. / Comstock, Sarah S.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Teuber, Suzanne S.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 6, e0157849, 01.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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