Blood Transfusion in Burns: What Do We Do?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over 11 million units of blood are transfused yearly in the United States. Although blood transfusion is common in burns, data are lacking on appropriate transfusion thresholds. The purpose of the study was to identify current burn center physician blood transfusion practices. A 30-question survey of blood transfusion practices was developed and sent to burn center directors. The survey assessed demographics, burn experience, and blood transfusion thresholds. Physicians were asked to list factors affecting their blood transfusion thresholds and then to give their blood transfusion threshold for patients based on age and percent burn. The final section presents three case scenarios with alterations in one physiological parameter to assess the effect on transfusion thresholds. A total of 55 of the 180 surveys (31%) were returned. Mean number of burn beds was 15.7 ± 1.4, with 264 ± 25 burn admissions per year. The respondents had been in burn care for 15.9 ± 1. 4 years. Their mean hemoglobin transfusion threshold was 8.12 ± 1.7 g/dl. The most frequent reasons for transfusion were ongoing blood loss (22%), anemia (20%), hypoxia (13%), and cardiac disease (12%). Inhalation injury influenced the decision to transfuse blood in 34%. The hemoglobin level below which respondents would transfuse blood increased with increasing TBSA burn, history of cardiac disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and age. Blood transfusion thresholds in burns vary based on burn percentage, age, and presence of cardiac disease. To date, no standard of care exists for blood transfusions in burns. Future prospective studies are needed to determine the appropriate use of blood in burns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-75
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

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Burns
Blood Transfusion
Burn Units
Heart Diseases
Hemoglobins
Physicians
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Standard of Care
Inhalation
Anemia
Demography
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Blood Transfusion in Burns : What Do We Do? / Palmieri, Tina L; Greenhalgh, David G.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 71-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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