Blood Pressure Control and Other Quality of Care Metrics for Patients with Obesity and Diabetes: A Population-Based Cohort Study

Jennifer T. Fink, Elizabeth Magnan, Heather M. Johnson, Lauren M. Bednarz, Glenn O. Allen, Robert T. Greenlee, Daniel M. Bolt, Maureen A. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: There are no population-level estimates in the United States for achievement of blood pressure goals in patients with diabetes and hypertension by obesity weight class. Aim: We sought to examine the relationship between the extent of obesity and the achievement of guideline-recommended blood pressure goals and other quality of care metrics among patients with diabetes. Methods: We conducted an observational population-based cohort study of electronic health data of three large health systems from 2010–2012 in rural, urban and suburban settings of 51,229 adults with diabetes. Outcomes were achievement of diabetes quality of care metrics: blood pressure, A1c, and LDL control, and A1c and LDL testing. Two blood pressure goals were examined given the recommendation for adults with diabetes of 130/80 mmHg from JNC7 and the recommendation of 140/90 mmHg from JNC8 in 2014. Results: Patients in obesity classes I, II, and III with diagnosed hypertension were less likely to achieve blood pressure control at both the 140/90 mmHg and 130/80 mmHg control levels. The patients from obesity class III had the lowest likelihood of achieving control at the 130/80 mmHg goal, and control was markedly worse for the 130/80 mmHg threshold in all weight classes. There were minimal to no differences by weight class in LDL and A1c control and LDL and A1c testing. Conclusions: Although the cardiovascular risk for patients with obesity and diabetes is greater than for non-obese patients with diabetes, we found that patients with obesity are even further behind in achieving blood pressure control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)391-399
Number of pages9
JournalHigh Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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Quality of Health Care
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Blood Pressure
Population
Weights and Measures
Hypertension
Health
Guidelines
oxidized low density lipoprotein

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Cardiovascular risk
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Blood Pressure Control and Other Quality of Care Metrics for Patients with Obesity and Diabetes : A Population-Based Cohort Study. / Fink, Jennifer T.; Magnan, Elizabeth; Johnson, Heather M.; Bednarz, Lauren M.; Allen, Glenn O.; Greenlee, Robert T.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Smith, Maureen A.

In: High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.12.2018, p. 391-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fink, Jennifer T. ; Magnan, Elizabeth ; Johnson, Heather M. ; Bednarz, Lauren M. ; Allen, Glenn O. ; Greenlee, Robert T. ; Bolt, Daniel M. ; Smith, Maureen A. / Blood Pressure Control and Other Quality of Care Metrics for Patients with Obesity and Diabetes : A Population-Based Cohort Study. In: High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Prevention. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 391-399.
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