Blood parasites in Owls with conservation implications for the Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis)

Heather D. Ishak, John P. Dumbacher, Nancy Anderson, John J. Keane, Gediminas Valkiünas, Susan M. Haig, Lisa A Tell, Ravinder N M Sehgal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

The three subspecies of Spotted Owl (Northern, Strix occidentalis courina; California, S. o. occidentalis; and Mexican, S. o. lucida) are all threatened by habitat loss and range expansion of the Barred Owl (S. varia). An unaddressed threat is whether Barred Owls could be a source of novel strains of disease such as avian malaria (Plasmodium spp.) or other blood parasites potentially harmful for Spotted Owls. Although Barred Owls commonly harbor Plasmodium infections, these parasites have not been documented in the Spotted Owl. We screened 111 Spotted Owls, 44 Barred Owls, and 387 owls of nine other species for haemosporidian parasites (Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium, and Haemoproteus spp.). California Spotted Owls had the greatest number of simultaneous multi-species infections (44%). Additionally, sequencing results revealed that the Northern and California Spotted Owl subspecies together had the highest number of Leucocytozoon parasite lineages (n=17) and unique lineages (n=12). This high level of sequence diversity is significant because only one leucocytozoon species (L. danilewskyi) has been accepted as valid among all owls, suggesting that L. danilewskyi is a cryptic species. Furthermore, a Plasmodium parasite was documented in a Northern Spotted Owl for the first time. West Coast Barred Owls had a lower prevalence of infection (15%) when compared to sympatric Spotted Owls (S. o. caurina 52%, S. o. occidentalis 79%) and Barred Owls from the historic range (61%). Consequently, Barred Owls on the West Coast may have a competitive advantage over the potentially immune compromised Spotted Owls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2304
JournalPLoS One
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

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    Ishak, H. D., Dumbacher, J. P., Anderson, N., Keane, J. J., Valkiünas, G., Haig, S. M., Tell, L. A., & Sehgal, R. N. M. (2008). Blood parasites in Owls with conservation implications for the Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis). PLoS One, 3(5), [e2304]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0002304