Bleeding complications associated with the use of rt-PA versus r-PA for peripheral arterial and venous thromboembolic occlusions

Thomas O. McNamara, Paul R Dong, Jack Chen, Barbara Quinn, Antoinette Gomes, Scott Goodwin, Kenric Aban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article analyzes the early experience with alteplase (rt-PA) and reteplase (r-PA) to identify noteworthy differences in bleeding and to determine correlations with dosage, concomitant anticoagulation, and duration of infusion. A retrospective review of the medical records was unavailable for the initial 82 patients who were treated with either rt-PA (44) or r-PA (38) for peripheral arterial or venous occlusions after urokinase therapy. Successful recanalization was achieved in 31/44 (70%) of the patients treated with rt-PA and in 34/38 (89%) of the patients treated with r-PA. Significant bleeding was documented in 20/44 (45%) of the rt-PA-treated patients (including 14 transfusions) versus 3/38 (8%) of the r-PA-treated patients (3 transfusions). Concomitant anticoagulation with either preceding warfarin (international normalized ratio > 1.1) or a bolus of heparin at the outset of the infusion was associated with significant bleeding in 13/17 (76%) of the rt-PA-treated patients (including 9 transfusions) versus 0/17 in the r-PA-treated patients. No significant correlation between either mean dose or total dose and bleeding was shown for either drug. Early experience indicates that r-PA is at least as effective as rt-PA for the thrombolysis of peripheral arterial and venous occlusions. It also appears that r-PA is less likely than rt-PA to be associated with significant bleeding during such infusions, especially if the patient is concomitantly anticoagulated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-98
Number of pages7
JournalTechniques in Vascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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